Impact of methylene chloride on microorganisms and phenanthrene mineralization in soil

Egbert Schwartz, Sinh V. Trinh, Kate M. Scow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of the quantity of methylene chloride, used as a carrier solvent for phenanthrene when added to soil, on phenanthrene mineralization kinetics, soil phospholipid fatty acid profiles (PLFA), and phenanthrene distribution. Methylene chloride dosages of 25 μL/g soil or more resulted in an enrichment of saturated PLFAs, suggesting soil microorganisms had adjusted their cell membranes in response to the solvent. A greater fraction of phenanthrene mineralized when spiked in 5 μL/g than in 25 μL/g methylene chloride suggesting that the methylene chloride became toxic to phenanthrene-degrading organisms in soil. Phenanthrene was more equally distributed among 0.1 g soil subsamples if spiked in 25 than 5 or 1 μL methylene chloride per gram soil. Thus the amount of methylene chloride used to spike phenanthrene in soil strongly impacted the mineralization kinetics, phenanthrene distribution, and microbial community in soil. Because a variety of spiking methods are used in biodegradation research, scientists should consider the quantity of solvents used when comparing results among different studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-149
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Environmental Quality
Volume31
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methylene Chloride
Dichloromethane
phenanthrene
Microorganisms
microorganism
chloride
mineralization
Soils
soil
kinetics
soil microorganism
Kinetics
Poisons
phospholipid
Phospholipids
Cell membranes
Biodegradation
Fatty acids
microbial community
biodegradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Impact of methylene chloride on microorganisms and phenanthrene mineralization in soil. / Schwartz, Egbert; Trinh, Sinh V.; Scow, Kate M.

In: Journal of Environmental Quality, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2002, p. 144-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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