Home-range and habitat selection by adult cougars in southern California

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the impact of habitat fragmentation, roads, and other anthropogenic influences on cougars (Puma concolor) requires quantitative assessment of habitat selection at multiple scales. We calculated annual and multiyear home ranges using a fixed-kernel (FK) estimator of home range for 13 adult female and 2 adult male radiotagged cougars that were monitored October 1986 through December 1992 in the Santa Ana Mountain Range of southern California, USA. Using compositional analysis, we assessed diurnal use of vegetation types and areas near roads at 2 orders of selection (second- and third-order; Johnson 1980). Mean annual and multiyear 85% FK home ranges for males were larger than those reported by previous studies in California. Mean wet-season 85% FK home ranges were significantly larger than those of the dry, season. At both scales of selection and across seasons, cougars preferred riparian habitats and avoided human-dominated habitats, Grasslands were the most avoided natural vegetation type at both scales of selection. Although cougar home ranges tended to be located away from high- and low-speed 2-lane paved roads (second-order avoidance), cougars did not avoid roads within their home range, especially when roads were in preferred riparian areas. Protection of habitat mosaics that include unroaded riparian areas is critical to the conservation of this cougar population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1235-1245
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Wildlife Management
Volume66
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2002

Fingerprint

Puma concolor
habitat preferences
home range
habitat selection
roads
road
riparian areas
vegetation type
vegetation types
habitat mosaic
seeds
habitat fragmentation
Anas
wet season
habitat conservation
dry season
habitats
anthropogenic activities
grassland
grasslands

Keywords

  • California
  • Compositional analysis
  • Cougar
  • Fixed-kernel home range
  • Habitat selection
  • Home range
  • Puma concolor
  • Riparian
  • Roads
  • Scale
  • Vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Home-range and habitat selection by adult cougars in southern California. / Dickson, Brett G; Beier, Paul.

In: Journal of Wildlife Management, Vol. 66, No. 4, 10.2002, p. 1235-1245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3d2555db863340009d2929f39f8a388d,
title = "Home-range and habitat selection by adult cougars in southern California",
abstract = "Understanding the impact of habitat fragmentation, roads, and other anthropogenic influences on cougars (Puma concolor) requires quantitative assessment of habitat selection at multiple scales. We calculated annual and multiyear home ranges using a fixed-kernel (FK) estimator of home range for 13 adult female and 2 adult male radiotagged cougars that were monitored October 1986 through December 1992 in the Santa Ana Mountain Range of southern California, USA. Using compositional analysis, we assessed diurnal use of vegetation types and areas near roads at 2 orders of selection (second- and third-order; Johnson 1980). Mean annual and multiyear 85{\%} FK home ranges for males were larger than those reported by previous studies in California. Mean wet-season 85{\%} FK home ranges were significantly larger than those of the dry, season. At both scales of selection and across seasons, cougars preferred riparian habitats and avoided human-dominated habitats, Grasslands were the most avoided natural vegetation type at both scales of selection. Although cougar home ranges tended to be located away from high- and low-speed 2-lane paved roads (second-order avoidance), cougars did not avoid roads within their home range, especially when roads were in preferred riparian areas. Protection of habitat mosaics that include unroaded riparian areas is critical to the conservation of this cougar population.",
keywords = "California, Compositional analysis, Cougar, Fixed-kernel home range, Habitat selection, Home range, Puma concolor, Riparian, Roads, Scale, Vegetation",
author = "Dickson, {Brett G} and Paul Beier",
year = "2002",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "66",
pages = "1235--1245",
journal = "Journal of Wildlife Management",
issn = "0022-541X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Home-range and habitat selection by adult cougars in southern California

AU - Dickson, Brett G

AU - Beier, Paul

PY - 2002/10

Y1 - 2002/10

N2 - Understanding the impact of habitat fragmentation, roads, and other anthropogenic influences on cougars (Puma concolor) requires quantitative assessment of habitat selection at multiple scales. We calculated annual and multiyear home ranges using a fixed-kernel (FK) estimator of home range for 13 adult female and 2 adult male radiotagged cougars that were monitored October 1986 through December 1992 in the Santa Ana Mountain Range of southern California, USA. Using compositional analysis, we assessed diurnal use of vegetation types and areas near roads at 2 orders of selection (second- and third-order; Johnson 1980). Mean annual and multiyear 85% FK home ranges for males were larger than those reported by previous studies in California. Mean wet-season 85% FK home ranges were significantly larger than those of the dry, season. At both scales of selection and across seasons, cougars preferred riparian habitats and avoided human-dominated habitats, Grasslands were the most avoided natural vegetation type at both scales of selection. Although cougar home ranges tended to be located away from high- and low-speed 2-lane paved roads (second-order avoidance), cougars did not avoid roads within their home range, especially when roads were in preferred riparian areas. Protection of habitat mosaics that include unroaded riparian areas is critical to the conservation of this cougar population.

AB - Understanding the impact of habitat fragmentation, roads, and other anthropogenic influences on cougars (Puma concolor) requires quantitative assessment of habitat selection at multiple scales. We calculated annual and multiyear home ranges using a fixed-kernel (FK) estimator of home range for 13 adult female and 2 adult male radiotagged cougars that were monitored October 1986 through December 1992 in the Santa Ana Mountain Range of southern California, USA. Using compositional analysis, we assessed diurnal use of vegetation types and areas near roads at 2 orders of selection (second- and third-order; Johnson 1980). Mean annual and multiyear 85% FK home ranges for males were larger than those reported by previous studies in California. Mean wet-season 85% FK home ranges were significantly larger than those of the dry, season. At both scales of selection and across seasons, cougars preferred riparian habitats and avoided human-dominated habitats, Grasslands were the most avoided natural vegetation type at both scales of selection. Although cougar home ranges tended to be located away from high- and low-speed 2-lane paved roads (second-order avoidance), cougars did not avoid roads within their home range, especially when roads were in preferred riparian areas. Protection of habitat mosaics that include unroaded riparian areas is critical to the conservation of this cougar population.

KW - California

KW - Compositional analysis

KW - Cougar

KW - Fixed-kernel home range

KW - Habitat selection

KW - Home range

KW - Puma concolor

KW - Riparian

KW - Roads

KW - Scale

KW - Vegetation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036816385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036816385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0036816385

VL - 66

SP - 1235

EP - 1245

JO - Journal of Wildlife Management

JF - Journal of Wildlife Management

SN - 0022-541X

IS - 4

ER -