Home language

Refuge, resistance, resource?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This presentation builds on the concept of orientations to languages other than English in the US first suggested by Ruíz (1984). Using examples from recent ethnographic, sociolinguistic, and policy-related investigations undertaken principally in North America, the discussion explores possible connections between individual and group language identities. It demonstrates that orientations to languages are dynamic inside and outside speech communities, varying across time and according to multiple contextual factors, including the history and size of local bilingual groups along with the impact of contemporary economic and political conditions. Often the conceptions of multiple languages reflected in policy and pedagogy oversimplify the complexity documented by research and raise questions for teaching practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-104
Number of pages16
JournalLanguage Teaching
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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language
resources
language group
sociolinguistics
teaching practice
history
community
economics
Resources
Home Language
Language
Refuge
Group
time
History
Language Groups
Speech Community
Teaching
Conception
Contextual Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Home language : Refuge, resistance, resource? / McGroarty, Mary.

In: Language Teaching, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 89-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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