Grief and Solidarity Reactions 1 Week After an On-Campus Shooting

Heidi A Wayment, Roxane Cohen Silver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of interpersonal violence extends beyond the victims and perpetrator(s). The purpose of this research was threefold: (a) to identify whether college students’ very early reactions to an on-campus shooting were associated with well-known predictors of distress, (b) to examine whether grief and distress reactions were distinguishable in the early days following a shooting, and (c) to investigate whether a compassionate self-identity was uniquely associated with grief but not distress. Beginning just 3 days after an early morning shooting that killed one student and injured three others, university students (N = 408) completed an online questionnaire. Grief, but not distress, was associated with a sense of solidarity with other students and a compassionate self-identity. General distress was associated with prior mental health difficulties and exposure to the shooting. Acute stress was positively associated with being female, having prior mental health difficulties, media exposure, perceived similarity to victims, less victim blame, social support, and social strain. Results suggest that grief reactions that arise in the early days following a collective loss may serve as important psychosocial resources in coping with interpersonal violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 1 2018

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Grief
Students
Violence
Mental Health
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Research

Keywords

  • community violence
  • media and violence
  • violence exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Grief and Solidarity Reactions 1 Week After an On-Campus Shooting. / Wayment, Heidi A; Silver, Roxane Cohen.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 01.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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