Genetic structure of a foundation species

Scaling community phenotypes from the individual to the region

R. K. Bangert, E. V. Lonsdorf, G. M. Wimp, Stephen M Shuster, D. Fischer, J. A. Schweitzer, Gerard J Allan, J. K. Bailey, Thomas G Whitham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the local and regional patterns of species distributions has been a major goal of ecological and evolutionary research. The notion that these patterns can be understood through simple quantitative rules is attractive, but while numerous scaling laws exist (e.g., metabolic, fractals), we are aware of no studies that have placed individual traits and community structure together within a genetics based scaling framework. We document the potential for a genetic basis to the scaling of ecological communities, largely based upon our long-term studies of poplars (Populus spp.). The genetic structure and diversity of these foundation species affects riparian ecosystems and determines a much larger community of dependent organisms. Three examples illustrate these ideas. First, there is a strong genetic basis to phytochemistry and tree architecture (both above- and belowground), which can affect diverse organisms and ecosystem processes. Second, empirical studies in the wild show that the local patterns of genetics based community structure scale up to western North America. At multiple spatial scales the arthropod community phenotype is related to the genetic distance among plants that these arthropods depend upon for survival. Third, we suggest that the familiar species-area curve, in which species richness is a function of area, is also a function of genetic diversity. We find that arthropod species richness is closely correlated with the genetic marker diversity and trait variance suggesting a genetic component to these curves. Finally, we discuss how genetic variation can interact with environmental variation to affect community attributes across geographic scales along with conservation implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-131
Number of pages11
JournalHeredity
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

Genetic Structures
Arthropods
Phenotype
phenotype
Ecosystem
arthropods
Populus
community structure
Biota
Fractals
North America
species diversity
arthropod communities
Genetic Markers
genetic variation
plant biochemistry
ecosystems
organisms
genetic variance
genetic distance

Keywords

  • Community phenotype
  • Community scaling
  • Foundation species
  • Genetic scaling
  • Genetic-area and species-area curves
  • Genetic-based traits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Genetic structure of a foundation species : Scaling community phenotypes from the individual to the region. / Bangert, R. K.; Lonsdorf, E. V.; Wimp, G. M.; Shuster, Stephen M; Fischer, D.; Schweitzer, J. A.; Allan, Gerard J; Bailey, J. K.; Whitham, Thomas G.

In: Heredity, Vol. 100, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 121-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bangert, R. K. ; Lonsdorf, E. V. ; Wimp, G. M. ; Shuster, Stephen M ; Fischer, D. ; Schweitzer, J. A. ; Allan, Gerard J ; Bailey, J. K. ; Whitham, Thomas G. / Genetic structure of a foundation species : Scaling community phenotypes from the individual to the region. In: Heredity. 2008 ; Vol. 100, No. 2. pp. 121-131.
@article{92bdecf1c1c7481eaf8234881ac9d9b8,
title = "Genetic structure of a foundation species: Scaling community phenotypes from the individual to the region",
abstract = "Understanding the local and regional patterns of species distributions has been a major goal of ecological and evolutionary research. The notion that these patterns can be understood through simple quantitative rules is attractive, but while numerous scaling laws exist (e.g., metabolic, fractals), we are aware of no studies that have placed individual traits and community structure together within a genetics based scaling framework. We document the potential for a genetic basis to the scaling of ecological communities, largely based upon our long-term studies of poplars (Populus spp.). The genetic structure and diversity of these foundation species affects riparian ecosystems and determines a much larger community of dependent organisms. Three examples illustrate these ideas. First, there is a strong genetic basis to phytochemistry and tree architecture (both above- and belowground), which can affect diverse organisms and ecosystem processes. Second, empirical studies in the wild show that the local patterns of genetics based community structure scale up to western North America. At multiple spatial scales the arthropod community phenotype is related to the genetic distance among plants that these arthropods depend upon for survival. Third, we suggest that the familiar species-area curve, in which species richness is a function of area, is also a function of genetic diversity. We find that arthropod species richness is closely correlated with the genetic marker diversity and trait variance suggesting a genetic component to these curves. Finally, we discuss how genetic variation can interact with environmental variation to affect community attributes across geographic scales along with conservation implications.",
keywords = "Community phenotype, Community scaling, Foundation species, Genetic scaling, Genetic-area and species-area curves, Genetic-based traits",
author = "Bangert, {R. K.} and Lonsdorf, {E. V.} and Wimp, {G. M.} and Shuster, {Stephen M} and D. Fischer and Schweitzer, {J. A.} and Allan, {Gerard J} and Bailey, {J. K.} and Whitham, {Thomas G}",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1038/sj.hdy.6800914",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "121--131",
journal = "Heredity",
issn = "0018-067X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic structure of a foundation species

T2 - Scaling community phenotypes from the individual to the region

AU - Bangert, R. K.

AU - Lonsdorf, E. V.

AU - Wimp, G. M.

AU - Shuster, Stephen M

AU - Fischer, D.

AU - Schweitzer, J. A.

AU - Allan, Gerard J

AU - Bailey, J. K.

AU - Whitham, Thomas G

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - Understanding the local and regional patterns of species distributions has been a major goal of ecological and evolutionary research. The notion that these patterns can be understood through simple quantitative rules is attractive, but while numerous scaling laws exist (e.g., metabolic, fractals), we are aware of no studies that have placed individual traits and community structure together within a genetics based scaling framework. We document the potential for a genetic basis to the scaling of ecological communities, largely based upon our long-term studies of poplars (Populus spp.). The genetic structure and diversity of these foundation species affects riparian ecosystems and determines a much larger community of dependent organisms. Three examples illustrate these ideas. First, there is a strong genetic basis to phytochemistry and tree architecture (both above- and belowground), which can affect diverse organisms and ecosystem processes. Second, empirical studies in the wild show that the local patterns of genetics based community structure scale up to western North America. At multiple spatial scales the arthropod community phenotype is related to the genetic distance among plants that these arthropods depend upon for survival. Third, we suggest that the familiar species-area curve, in which species richness is a function of area, is also a function of genetic diversity. We find that arthropod species richness is closely correlated with the genetic marker diversity and trait variance suggesting a genetic component to these curves. Finally, we discuss how genetic variation can interact with environmental variation to affect community attributes across geographic scales along with conservation implications.

AB - Understanding the local and regional patterns of species distributions has been a major goal of ecological and evolutionary research. The notion that these patterns can be understood through simple quantitative rules is attractive, but while numerous scaling laws exist (e.g., metabolic, fractals), we are aware of no studies that have placed individual traits and community structure together within a genetics based scaling framework. We document the potential for a genetic basis to the scaling of ecological communities, largely based upon our long-term studies of poplars (Populus spp.). The genetic structure and diversity of these foundation species affects riparian ecosystems and determines a much larger community of dependent organisms. Three examples illustrate these ideas. First, there is a strong genetic basis to phytochemistry and tree architecture (both above- and belowground), which can affect diverse organisms and ecosystem processes. Second, empirical studies in the wild show that the local patterns of genetics based community structure scale up to western North America. At multiple spatial scales the arthropod community phenotype is related to the genetic distance among plants that these arthropods depend upon for survival. Third, we suggest that the familiar species-area curve, in which species richness is a function of area, is also a function of genetic diversity. We find that arthropod species richness is closely correlated with the genetic marker diversity and trait variance suggesting a genetic component to these curves. Finally, we discuss how genetic variation can interact with environmental variation to affect community attributes across geographic scales along with conservation implications.

KW - Community phenotype

KW - Community scaling

KW - Foundation species

KW - Genetic scaling

KW - Genetic-area and species-area curves

KW - Genetic-based traits

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38549102469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38549102469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.hdy.6800914

DO - 10.1038/sj.hdy.6800914

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 121

EP - 131

JO - Heredity

JF - Heredity

SN - 0018-067X

IS - 2

ER -