Gendering Climate Change: A Feminist Criminological Perspective

Nancy A Wonders, Mona J E Danner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing on insights from feminist scholars and activists, this article examines the dialectical relationship between climate change and the social construction of gender. We examine in detail how gender inequalities associated with capitalism, particularly in its latest Neoliberal incarnation, help to produce global warming, as well as to produce gendered vulnerabilities and unequal impacts. After a brief review of past successes and failures to integrate gender concerns into climate change debates and policies, we suggest several criminological interventions that are compatible with a feminist perspective on climate change. We argue that a stronger criminological focus on the global political economy, particularly on the gendered inequalities it produces, is analytically essential for understanding both the etiology and harmful consequences of climate change. Simultaneously, we urge critical criminologists to employ the tools of our trade to take a more proactive role in the social construction of a just and sustainable society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-416
Number of pages16
JournalCritical Criminology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

climate change
social construction
gender
etiology
capitalist society
political economy
vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Gendering Climate Change : A Feminist Criminological Perspective. / Wonders, Nancy A; Danner, Mona J E.

In: Critical Criminology, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.11.2015, p. 401-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0eb9339a4bf54690a4562bea1c0d788e,
title = "Gendering Climate Change: A Feminist Criminological Perspective",
abstract = "Drawing on insights from feminist scholars and activists, this article examines the dialectical relationship between climate change and the social construction of gender. We examine in detail how gender inequalities associated with capitalism, particularly in its latest Neoliberal incarnation, help to produce global warming, as well as to produce gendered vulnerabilities and unequal impacts. After a brief review of past successes and failures to integrate gender concerns into climate change debates and policies, we suggest several criminological interventions that are compatible with a feminist perspective on climate change. We argue that a stronger criminological focus on the global political economy, particularly on the gendered inequalities it produces, is analytically essential for understanding both the etiology and harmful consequences of climate change. Simultaneously, we urge critical criminologists to employ the tools of our trade to take a more proactive role in the social construction of a just and sustainable society.",
author = "Wonders, {Nancy A} and Danner, {Mona J E}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10612-015-9290-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "401--416",
journal = "Critical Criminology",
issn = "1205-8629",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gendering Climate Change

T2 - A Feminist Criminological Perspective

AU - Wonders, Nancy A

AU - Danner, Mona J E

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Drawing on insights from feminist scholars and activists, this article examines the dialectical relationship between climate change and the social construction of gender. We examine in detail how gender inequalities associated with capitalism, particularly in its latest Neoliberal incarnation, help to produce global warming, as well as to produce gendered vulnerabilities and unequal impacts. After a brief review of past successes and failures to integrate gender concerns into climate change debates and policies, we suggest several criminological interventions that are compatible with a feminist perspective on climate change. We argue that a stronger criminological focus on the global political economy, particularly on the gendered inequalities it produces, is analytically essential for understanding both the etiology and harmful consequences of climate change. Simultaneously, we urge critical criminologists to employ the tools of our trade to take a more proactive role in the social construction of a just and sustainable society.

AB - Drawing on insights from feminist scholars and activists, this article examines the dialectical relationship between climate change and the social construction of gender. We examine in detail how gender inequalities associated with capitalism, particularly in its latest Neoliberal incarnation, help to produce global warming, as well as to produce gendered vulnerabilities and unequal impacts. After a brief review of past successes and failures to integrate gender concerns into climate change debates and policies, we suggest several criminological interventions that are compatible with a feminist perspective on climate change. We argue that a stronger criminological focus on the global political economy, particularly on the gendered inequalities it produces, is analytically essential for understanding both the etiology and harmful consequences of climate change. Simultaneously, we urge critical criminologists to employ the tools of our trade to take a more proactive role in the social construction of a just and sustainable society.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943366082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84943366082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10612-015-9290-7

DO - 10.1007/s10612-015-9290-7

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84943366082

VL - 23

SP - 401

EP - 416

JO - Critical Criminology

JF - Critical Criminology

SN - 1205-8629

IS - 4

ER -