Gender roles in a masculine occupation: Military men and women’s differential negotiation of the work-family interface

Ann H Huffman, Satoris S. Culbertson, Joseph Barbour

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gender plays a key role in the attitudes and behaviors exhibited by individuals in both their work and family domains. Just as individuals can lie anywhere on a continuum from masculine to feminine, occupations can be similarly gender-typed. We argue that norms related to masculinity (vs. femininity) can influence one’s selfselection into an occupation and one’s work attitudes and behaviors once associated with an occupation. Since men and women associated with masculine occupations have unique work and family expectations, they also experience and negotiate the work-family interface differently than do individuals in more gender-neutral organizations. In this chapter, we use the military as an example of a gendered occupation “a masculine one to be specific. We introduce the Masculine Occupations’ Gender Role Model to provide a theoretical framework of how the gender of employees in a gendered occupation can influence attitudes and behavior in both the work and family domains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGender and the Work-Family Experience: An Intersection of Two Domains
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages271-289
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9783319088914, 9783319088907
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Combat
  • Gender
  • Gender Norms
  • Gendered Occupation
  • Homosexuality
  • Masculine
  • Military
  • Stigma
  • Work Family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Huffman, A. H., Culbertson, S. S., & Barbour, J. (2015). Gender roles in a masculine occupation: Military men and women’s differential negotiation of the work-family interface. In Gender and the Work-Family Experience: An Intersection of Two Domains (pp. 271-289). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08891-4_14