Gender Differences in Perceptions of Resources and Turnover Intentions of Work-Linked Couples in Masculine Occupations

Ann H Huffman, Kristine J. Olson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Employees in work-linked marriages have spouses that share the same family and the same workplace and/or occupation. Whereas, in recent years, there has been increasingly more research on dual-career marriages (i.e. both spouses work, but not necessarily at the same workplace and/or occupation), there has been very little research on work-linked marriages. The current study focuses on work resources (i.e. family supportive supervisor behaviour and job control) as key mediating processes that explain the effect of gender on turnover intentions among work-linked employees in masculine occupations (i.e. military). Investigating gender differences is important because, compared with men, women are more likely to be in work-linked marriages and to leave their jobs. Based on role theory and conservation of resource theory, we predicted that gender was related to turnover intentions, and this relationship would be mediated by key explanatory variables (i.e. family supportive supervisor behaviours, job control and psychological distress). Mediation analyses, conducted on a sample of men and women in work-linked marriages (n=309), provide support for the hypothesized model. These findings offer guidance for understanding gender differences among work-linked employees in masculine occupations, and how these differences can affect important outcomes such as turnover intentions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalStress and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Occupations
Marriage
Behavior Control
Spouses
Workplace
Research
Psychology

Keywords

  • Dual-career
  • Gender differences
  • Masculine occupations
  • Turnover intentions
  • Work-family
  • Work-linked

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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