Gamification for learning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Game-based learning (GBL) has been recognized to impact cognitive development, motivation, and decision making (Gee, 2003). Lazzaro (2004) contended that games trigger human emotions, such as excitement, amazement, sense of achievement, happiness, frustration, etc. Gamifi cation has been applied to diverse fi elds, from education, learning, medicine, business, library, to military science, etc. Educators agree that gaming enhances the ability of learners to gain a new perspective through active engagements in collaborative decision making to solve problems (Gee, 2003; Huang, Yeh, Li, & Chang, 2010; Reese et al., 2011). Researchers have identifi ed that integrating gaming into learning has the potential to support attitude change (Hays, 2005), behavior change (Schoech, Boyas, Black, & Elias-Lambert, 2013), enhance learning motivation (Garris, Ahlers, & Driskell, 2002), encourage collaboration (Schafer et al., 2013), induce problem-based learning, activate communication, promote active engagement (Giannetto, Chao, & Fontana, 2013; Mitchell #$x26; Savill-Smith, 2005), peer-generated user content, motivated informed action (Lee, Ceyhan, Jordan-Cooley, & Sung, 2013), particularly when engaging underserved learners (De Freitas, 2008). In fact, when learners are empowered as game designers in participatory design strategy, the benefi ts are found to be more abundant and more effective (Dickey, 2005).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedia Rich Instruction: Connecting Curriculum to All Learners
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages203-218
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9783319001524, 9783319001517
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

learning
military science
decision making
learning motivation
attitude change
cognitive development
Jordan
frustration
happiness
emotion
medicine
educator
communication
ability
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Tu, C-H., Sujo-Montes, L. E., & Yen, C. J. (2014). Gamification for learning. In Media Rich Instruction: Connecting Curriculum to All Learners (pp. 203-218). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00152-4_13

Gamification for learning. / Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Sujo-Montes, Laura E; Yen, Cherng Jyh.

Media Rich Instruction: Connecting Curriculum to All Learners. Springer International Publishing, 2014. p. 203-218.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tu, C-H, Sujo-Montes, LE & Yen, CJ 2014, Gamification for learning. in Media Rich Instruction: Connecting Curriculum to All Learners. Springer International Publishing, pp. 203-218. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00152-4_13
Tu C-H, Sujo-Montes LE, Yen CJ. Gamification for learning. In Media Rich Instruction: Connecting Curriculum to All Learners. Springer International Publishing. 2014. p. 203-218 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00152-4_13
Tu, Chih-Hsiung ; Sujo-Montes, Laura E ; Yen, Cherng Jyh. / Gamification for learning. Media Rich Instruction: Connecting Curriculum to All Learners. Springer International Publishing, 2014. pp. 203-218
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