Fire, death, and rebirth: A metaphoric analysis of the 1988 yellowstone fire debate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This essay analyzes the public debate concerning management of the 1988 Yellowstone orest fires. Two primary archetypal metaphors-death and rebirth-emerged. These provided a conceptual world view which helped observers define the situation and gave advocates an inventional tool for advancing their own agenda regarding fire policy and national park management. The crisis brought two competing views of public land management to the forefront of public discussion: The ecological view that public lands must be managed from a holistic view of resources and the human-centered view that resource use should recognize the preeminence of humans in policy-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-125
Number of pages23
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fires
death
management
national park
resources
metaphor
Metaphoric
Rebirth
Resources
Public Lands
Primary Metaphor
World View
Agenda
National Parks
Public Debate
Policy Making
Observer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

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