Fire Climatology in the western United States

Introduction to special issue

Thomas W. Swetnam, Scott R Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in fire climatology have derived from recent studies of modern and paleoecological records. We convened a series of workshops and a conference session to report and review regional-scale findings, and these meetings led to the 10 papers in this special issue. Two papers focus on fire and climate patterns in the modern era using documentary records, four papers utilise tree rings to evaluate recent centuries of change, and four papers evaluate charcoal and pollen in lake, bog, and alluvial sediments over the Holocene. Here we summarise some of the key findings from these papers in the context of other recent fire climatology literature. These studies illustrate the value of long-term perspectives and spatial networks of fire and climate data in discovering the patterns and modes of past fire regime and climate variations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Wildland Fire
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Western United States
climatology
climate
fire regime
bogs
growth rings
charcoal
climate variation
bog
tree ring
alluvial deposit
pollen
lakes
sediments
Holocene
lake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Fire Climatology in the western United States : Introduction to special issue. / Swetnam, Thomas W.; Anderson, Scott R.

In: International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2008, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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