Eyewitness Reporting by Navajo and Mainstream-Culture Children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined culturally based differences in children's eyewitness reporting. The same live event was enacted with one mainstream-culture and one Navajo (Diné) third-grade class. Ten days later an interviewer used a forensic protocol to question each child. The children's answers were analyzed for amount and accuracy of reported information. Mainstream-culture children reported more information overall than the Navajo, but the groups did not differ in accuracy. Active participation affected the amount of information reported by mainstream-culture children, whereas Navajo children were equally informative as either participants or observers. Results indicate a cultural orientation to the recall of personally experienced events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-175
Number of pages10
JournalCommunication Disorders Quarterly
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Eyewitness Reporting by Navajo and Mainstream-Culture Children. / Lindstedt, Delores E.

In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2000, p. 166-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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