ExploreNEOs. II. the accuracy of the warm spitzer near-earth object survey

A. W. Harris, M. Mommert, J. L. Hora, M. Mueller, David E Trilling, B. Bhattacharya, W. F. Bottke, S. Chesley, M. Delbo, J. P. Emery, G. Fazio, A. Mainzer, B. Penprase, H. A. Smith, T. B. Spahr, J. A. Stansberry, C. A. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We report on results of observations of near-Earth objects (NEOs) performed with the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope as part of our ongoing (2009-2011) Warm Spitzer NEO survey ("ExploreNEOs"), the primary aim of which is to provide sizes and albedos of some 700 NEOs. The emphasis of the work described here is an assessment of the overall accuracy of our survey results, which are based on a semi-empirical generalized model of asteroid thermal emission. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope has been operated in the so-called Warm Spitzer mission phase since the cryogen was depleted in 2009 May, with the two shortest-wavelength channels, centered at 3.6μm and 4.5μm, of the Infrared Array Camera continuing to provide valuable data. The set of some 170 NEOs in our current Warm Spitzer results catalog contains 28 for which published taxonomic classifications are available, and 14 for which relatively reliable published diameters and albedos are available. A comparison of the Warm Spitzer results with previously published results ("ground truth"), complemented by a Monte Carlo error analysis, indicates that the rms Warm Spitzer diameter and albedo errors are ±20% and ±50%, respectively. Cases in which agreement with results from the literature is worse than expected are highlighted and discussed; these include the potential spacecraft target 138911 2001 AE2. We confirm that 1.4 appears to be an appropriate overall default value for the relative reflectance between the V band and the Warm Spitzer wavelengths, for use in correction of the Warm Spitzer fluxes for reflected solar radiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number75
JournalAstronomical Journal
Volume141
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

near Earth objects
albedo
Space Infrared Telescope Facility
wavelength
ground truth
error analysis
thermal emission
solar radiation
extremely high frequencies
asteroids
wavelengths
asteroid
catalogs
reflectance
spacecraft
cameras

Keywords

  • infrared: planetary systems
  • minor planets, asteroids: general
  • surveys

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Harris, A. W., Mommert, M., Hora, J. L., Mueller, M., Trilling, D. E., Bhattacharya, B., ... Thomas, C. A. (2011). ExploreNEOs. II. the accuracy of the warm spitzer near-earth object survey. Astronomical Journal, 141(3), [75]. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/141/3/75

ExploreNEOs. II. the accuracy of the warm spitzer near-earth object survey. / Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Hora, J. L.; Mueller, M.; Trilling, David E; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Delbo, M.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Mainzer, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.; Thomas, C. A.

In: Astronomical Journal, Vol. 141, No. 3, 75, 03.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, AW, Mommert, M, Hora, JL, Mueller, M, Trilling, DE, Bhattacharya, B, Bottke, WF, Chesley, S, Delbo, M, Emery, JP, Fazio, G, Mainzer, A, Penprase, B, Smith, HA, Spahr, TB, Stansberry, JA & Thomas, CA 2011, 'ExploreNEOs. II. the accuracy of the warm spitzer near-earth object survey', Astronomical Journal, vol. 141, no. 3, 75. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/141/3/75
Harris, A. W. ; Mommert, M. ; Hora, J. L. ; Mueller, M. ; Trilling, David E ; Bhattacharya, B. ; Bottke, W. F. ; Chesley, S. ; Delbo, M. ; Emery, J. P. ; Fazio, G. ; Mainzer, A. ; Penprase, B. ; Smith, H. A. ; Spahr, T. B. ; Stansberry, J. A. ; Thomas, C. A. / ExploreNEOs. II. the accuracy of the warm spitzer near-earth object survey. In: Astronomical Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 141, No. 3.
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AU - Fazio, G.

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