Exercise effect on oxidative stress is independent of change in estrogen metabolism

Kathryn H. Schmitz, Meghan Warren, Andrew G. Rundle, Nancy I. Williams, Myron D. Gross, Mindy S. Kurzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The effect of exercise training on lipid peroxidation and endogenous estrogens is not well understood in premenopausal women. Exercise effects on these variables could mediate observed associations of exercise with hormonally related cancers, including breast cancer. The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of 15 weeks of aerobic exercise on lipid peroxidation, endogenous estrogens, and body composition in young, healthy eumenorrheic women. Methods: Fifteen sedentary premenopausal women (18-25 years) participated. Pre- and post-exercise training urine collection (three 24-h samples) started 48 h after most recent exercise session for analysis of a marker of lipid peroxidation (F2-isoprostane) and endogenous estrogens, including 2-hydroxyestrogens, 4-hydroxyestrogens, 16-α-hydroxyestrone, and ratios of these metabolites (2:16, 2:4). Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and F2-isoprostanes and estrogens were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Aerobic exercise resulted in a 34% decrease in F2-isoprostane (P = 0.02), a 10% increase in fitness (P = 0.004), a 1.2 kg decrease in body mass (P = 0.007), and a 1.8 kg decrease in fat mass (P = 0.04). No significant changes were noted in estrogens. Conclusions: The effect of exercise training on oxidative stress may be relevant to risk for hormonally related cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-223
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Estrogens
Oxidative Stress
Exercise
F2-Isoprostanes
Lipid Peroxidation
Body Composition
Breast Neoplasms
Urine Specimen Collection
Photon Absorptiometry
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Fats
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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Exercise effect on oxidative stress is independent of change in estrogen metabolism. / Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Warren, Meghan; Rundle, Andrew G.; Williams, Nancy I.; Gross, Myron D.; Kurzer, Mindy S.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 220-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmitz, Kathryn H. ; Warren, Meghan ; Rundle, Andrew G. ; Williams, Nancy I. ; Gross, Myron D. ; Kurzer, Mindy S. / Exercise effect on oxidative stress is independent of change in estrogen metabolism. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 220-223.
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