Examining the global distribution of dominant archaeal populations in soil

Scott T. Bates, Donna Berg-Lyons, James G Caporaso, William A. Walters, Rob Knight, Noah Fierer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

548 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Archaea, primarily Crenarchaeota, are common in soil; however, the structure of soil archaeal communities and the factors regulating their diversity and abundance remain poorly understood. Here, we used barcoded pyrosequencing to comprehensively survey archaeal and bacterial communities in 146 soils, representing a multitude of soil and ecosystem types from across the globe. Relative archaeal abundance, the percentage of all 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered that were archaeal, averaged 2% across all soils and ranged from 0% to 10% in individual soils. Soil C:N ratio was the only factor consistently correlated with archaeal relative abundances, being higher in soils with lower C:N ratios. Soil archaea communities were dominated by just two phylotypes from a constrained clade within the Crenarchaeota, which together accounted for 70% of all archaeal sequences obtained in the survey. As one of these phylotypes was closely related to a previously identified putative ammonia oxidizer, we sampled from two long-term nitrogen (N) addition experiments to determine if this taxon responds to experimental manipulations of N availability. Contrary to expectations, the abundance of this dominant taxon, as well as archaea overall, tended to decline with increasing N. This trend was coupled with a concurrent increase in known N-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting competitive interactions between these groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)908-917
Number of pages10
JournalISME Journal
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Soil
Population
Archaea
soil
Crenarchaeota
carbon nitrogen ratio
relative abundance
soil bacteria
distribution
soil structure
oxidants
ammonia
rRNA Genes
Ammonia
soil type
ribosomal RNA
Ecosystem
nucleotide sequences
Nitrogen
ecosystems

Keywords

  • archaea
  • Crenarchaeota
  • microbial ecology
  • pyrosequencing
  • soil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Bates, S. T., Berg-Lyons, D., Caporaso, J. G., Walters, W. A., Knight, R., & Fierer, N. (2011). Examining the global distribution of dominant archaeal populations in soil. ISME Journal, 5(5), 908-917. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2010.171

Examining the global distribution of dominant archaeal populations in soil. / Bates, Scott T.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Caporaso, James G; Walters, William A.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah.

In: ISME Journal, Vol. 5, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 908-917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bates, ST, Berg-Lyons, D, Caporaso, JG, Walters, WA, Knight, R & Fierer, N 2011, 'Examining the global distribution of dominant archaeal populations in soil', ISME Journal, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 908-917. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2010.171
Bates, Scott T. ; Berg-Lyons, Donna ; Caporaso, James G ; Walters, William A. ; Knight, Rob ; Fierer, Noah. / Examining the global distribution of dominant archaeal populations in soil. In: ISME Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 5, No. 5. pp. 908-917.
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