Evidence for multiple ecological roles of Leptographium abietinum, a symbiotic fungus associated with the North American spruce beetle

Thomas S. Davis, Jane E. Stewart, Andrew Mann, Clifford Bradley, Richard Hofstetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ophiostomatoid fungus Leptographium abietinum is symbiotic with the North American spruce beetle Dendroctonus rufipennis; however, the ecology of these interactions are not understood. Multiple functional hypotheses regarding beetle-symbiont interactions pervade the literature, especially the view that symbionts may provide nutrition, competitively exclude antagonistic microbes, or detoxify host plant compounds. Here, these three hypotheses are tested in an effort to discern whether the ecological profile of L. abietinum is consistent with bark beetle-fungus mutualisms. Three important findings emerged: (1) by comparison with conifer phloem, L. abietinum mycelia contained considerable quantities of N, P, and protein; (2) L. abietinum outcompetes a ubiquitous entomopathogen for growing space in a resource-limited environment and can maintain captured space; and (3) inoculation with L. abietinum significantly reduced concentrations of a tree defensive compound, (+)-3-carene, in growth media. Collectively, these findings indicate that L. abietinum fulfills multiple ecological functions that are potentially consistent with bark beetle-fungus mutualism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFungal Ecology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Dendroctonus rufipennis
Leptographium
beetle
bark beetles
fungus
symbionts
fungi
symbiont
bark
carene
entomopathogens
ecological function
mutualism
phloem
mycelium
conifers
host plants
culture media
vaccination
nutrition

Keywords

  • Ascomycota
  • Bark beetle
  • Competition
  • Detoxification
  • Mutualism
  • Nutrition
  • Ophiostomatoid
  • Symbiosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Ecological Modeling
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Evidence for multiple ecological roles of Leptographium abietinum, a symbiotic fungus associated with the North American spruce beetle. / Davis, Thomas S.; Stewart, Jane E.; Mann, Andrew; Bradley, Clifford; Hofstetter, Richard.

In: Fungal Ecology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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