Estimating the strength of sexual selection from y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA diversity

Michael J. Wade, Stephen M Shuster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We show that a sex difference in the opportunity for selection results in sex differences in the strength of random genetic drift and thus creates different patterns of genetic diversity for maternally and paternally inherited haploid genes. We derive the effective population size Ne for a male-limited or female-limited haploid gene in terms of 1, the "opportunity for selection" or the variance in relative fitness. Because the variance in relative fitness of males can be an order of magnitude larger than that of females, the Ne is much smaller for males than it is for females. We derive both nonequilibrium and equilibrium expressions for FST in terms of 7 and show how the portion of 7 owing to sexual selection, I mates, that is, the variation among males in mate numbers, is a simple function of the F's for cytoplasmic (female inherited) and Y-linked (male inherited) genes. Because multiple, transgenerational data are lacking to apply the nonequilibrium expression, we apply only the equilibrium model to published data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial sequence divergence in Homo sapiens to quantify the opportunity for sexual selection. The estimate suggests that sexual selection in humans represents a minimum of 54.8% of total selection, supporting Darwin's proposal that sexual selection has played a significant role in human evolution and the recent proposal regarding a shift from polygamy to monogamy in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1613-1616
Number of pages4
JournalEvolution
Volume58
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

sexual selection
Mitochondrial DNA
mitochondrial DNA
chromosome
Chromosomes
chromosomes
Haploidy
Marriage
gender differences
Sex Characteristics
haploidy
gene
fitness
polygamy
Genes
monogamy
Genetic Drift
human evolution
genes
Y Chromosome

Keywords

  • Effective population size
  • F
  • Haplotype diversity
  • Homo sapiens
  • Opportunity for selection
  • Sex difference in selection
  • Sexual selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Ecology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Estimating the strength of sexual selection from y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA diversity. / Wade, Michael J.; Shuster, Stephen M.

In: Evolution, Vol. 58, No. 7, 07.2004, p. 1613-1616.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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