Equids engineer desert water availability

Erick J. Lundgren, Daniel Ramp, Juliet C. Stromberg, Jianguo Wu, Nathan C. Nieto, Martin Sluk, Karla T. Moeller, Arian D. Wallach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Megafauna play important roles in the biosphere, yet little is known about how they shape dryland ecosystems. We report on an overlooked form of ecosystem engineering by donkeys and horses. In the deserts of North America, digging of ≤2-meter wells to groundwater by feral equids increased the density of water features, reduced distances between waters, and, at times, provided the only water present. Vertebrate richness and activity were higher at equid wells than at adjacent dry sites, and, by mimicking flood disturbance, equid wells became nurseries for riparian trees. Our results suggest that equids, even those that are introduced or feral, are able to buffer water availability, which may increase resilience to ongoing human-caused aridification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-495
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume372
Issue number6541
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 30 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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