Emotional intelligence and implications for counseling self-efficacy: Phase II

Crystal Easton, William E Martin Jr, Sheilah Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors present Phase II of a 9-month study of the relationship between emotional intelligence and counseling self-efficacy. One-hundred eighteen counselors-in-training and professional counselors completed the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE) and Emotional Judgment Inventory (EJI). There was a significant correlation between 2 of the EJI scales (Identifying Own Emotions and Identifying Others’ Emotions) and 4 of the 5 COSE scales. Students’ perceived counseling self-efficacy showed a significant gain when compared with that of professional counselors over the 9-month period. Results support findings of Phase I (W. E. Martin, C. Easton, S. Wilson, M. Takemoto, & S. Sullivan, 2004), which indicated that emotional intelligence may be a unique construct inherent in persons who are preparing for careers as professional counselors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-232
Number of pages15
JournalCounselor Education and Supervision
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Emotional Intelligence
emotional intelligence
Self Efficacy
counselor
self-efficacy
Counseling
counseling
Equipment and Supplies
Emotions
emotion
career
Students
human being
Counselors
present
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Emotional intelligence and implications for counseling self-efficacy : Phase II. / Easton, Crystal; Martin Jr, William E; Wilson, Sheilah.

In: Counselor Education and Supervision, Vol. 47, No. 4, 01.01.2008, p. 218-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5f2a244ac99e4142b772c7ff97456644,
title = "Emotional intelligence and implications for counseling self-efficacy: Phase II",
abstract = "The authors present Phase II of a 9-month study of the relationship between emotional intelligence and counseling self-efficacy. One-hundred eighteen counselors-in-training and professional counselors completed the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE) and Emotional Judgment Inventory (EJI). There was a significant correlation between 2 of the EJI scales (Identifying Own Emotions and Identifying Others’ Emotions) and 4 of the 5 COSE scales. Students’ perceived counseling self-efficacy showed a significant gain when compared with that of professional counselors over the 9-month period. Results support findings of Phase I (W. E. Martin, C. Easton, S. Wilson, M. Takemoto, & S. Sullivan, 2004), which indicated that emotional intelligence may be a unique construct inherent in persons who are preparing for careers as professional counselors.",
author = "Crystal Easton and {Martin Jr}, {William E} and Sheilah Wilson",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/j.1556-6978.2008.tb00053.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "218--232",
journal = "Counselor Education and Supervision",
issn = "0011-0035",
publisher = "American Counseling Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emotional intelligence and implications for counseling self-efficacy

T2 - Phase II

AU - Easton, Crystal

AU - Martin Jr, William E

AU - Wilson, Sheilah

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - The authors present Phase II of a 9-month study of the relationship between emotional intelligence and counseling self-efficacy. One-hundred eighteen counselors-in-training and professional counselors completed the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE) and Emotional Judgment Inventory (EJI). There was a significant correlation between 2 of the EJI scales (Identifying Own Emotions and Identifying Others’ Emotions) and 4 of the 5 COSE scales. Students’ perceived counseling self-efficacy showed a significant gain when compared with that of professional counselors over the 9-month period. Results support findings of Phase I (W. E. Martin, C. Easton, S. Wilson, M. Takemoto, & S. Sullivan, 2004), which indicated that emotional intelligence may be a unique construct inherent in persons who are preparing for careers as professional counselors.

AB - The authors present Phase II of a 9-month study of the relationship between emotional intelligence and counseling self-efficacy. One-hundred eighteen counselors-in-training and professional counselors completed the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE) and Emotional Judgment Inventory (EJI). There was a significant correlation between 2 of the EJI scales (Identifying Own Emotions and Identifying Others’ Emotions) and 4 of the 5 COSE scales. Students’ perceived counseling self-efficacy showed a significant gain when compared with that of professional counselors over the 9-month period. Results support findings of Phase I (W. E. Martin, C. Easton, S. Wilson, M. Takemoto, & S. Sullivan, 2004), which indicated that emotional intelligence may be a unique construct inherent in persons who are preparing for careers as professional counselors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952796552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952796552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/j.1556-6978.2008.tb00053.x

DO - 10.1002/j.1556-6978.2008.tb00053.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:79952796552

VL - 47

SP - 218

EP - 232

JO - Counselor Education and Supervision

JF - Counselor Education and Supervision

SN - 0011-0035

IS - 4

ER -