Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

B. D. Amiro, A. G. Barr, J. G. Barr, T. A. Black, R. Bracho, M. Brown, J. Chen, K. L. Clark, K. J. Davis, A. R. Desai, S. Dore, V. Engel, J. D. Fuentes, A. H. Goldstein, M. L. Goulden, Thomas E Kolb, M. B. Lavigne, B. E. Law, H. A. Margolis, T. Martin & 7 others J. H. McCaughey, L. Misson, M. Montes-Helu, A. Noormets, J. T. Randerson, G. Starr, J. Xiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

269 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disturbances are important for renewal of North American forests. Here we summarize more than 180 site years of eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide flux made at forest chronosequences in North America. The disturbances included stand-replacing fire (Alaska, Arizona, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan) and harvest (British Columbia, Florida, New Brunswick, Oregon, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Wisconsin) events, insect infestations (gypsy moth, forest tent caterpillar, and mountain pine beetle), Hurricane Wilma, and silvicultural thinning (Arizona, California, and New Brunswick). Net ecosystem production (NEP) showed a carbon loss from all ecosystems following a stand-replacing disturbance, becoming a carbon sink by 20 years for all ecosystems and by 10 years for most. Maximum carbon losses following disturbance (g C m -2y-1) ranged from 1270 in Florida to 200 in boreal ecosystems. Similarly, for forests less than 100 years old, maximum uptake (g C m-2y-1) was 1180 in Florida mangroves and 210 in boreal ecosystems. More temperate forests had intermediate fluxes. Boreal ecosystems were relatively time invariant after 20 years, whereas western ecosystems tended to increase in carbon gain over time. This was driven mostly by gross photosynthetic production (GPP) because total ecosystem respiration (ER) and heterotrophic respiration were relatively invariant with age. GPP/ER was as low as 0.2 immediately following stand-replacing disturbance reaching a constant value of 1.2 after 20 years. NEP following insect defoliations and silvicultural thinning showed lesser changes than stand-replacing events, with decreases in the year of disturbance followed by rapid recovery. NEP decreased in a mangrove ecosystem following Hurricane Wilma because of a decrease in GPP and an increase in ER.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberG00K02
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research E: Planets
Volume115
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

ecosystems
Carbon Dioxide
Ecosystems
carbon dioxide
disturbances
Fluxes
disturbance
ecosystem
net ecosystem production
ecosystem respiration
respiration
New Brunswick
hurricanes
Saskatchewan
thinning (plants)
carbon
Carbon
Malacosoma disstria
hurricane
mangrove

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Forestry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Palaeontology
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

Cite this

Amiro, B. D., Barr, A. G., Barr, J. G., Black, T. A., Bracho, R., Brown, M., ... Xiao, J. (2010). Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America. Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, 115(4), [G00K02]. https://doi.org/10.1029/2010JG001390

Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America. / Amiro, B. D.; Barr, A. G.; Barr, J. G.; Black, T. A.; Bracho, R.; Brown, M.; Chen, J.; Clark, K. L.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dore, S.; Engel, V.; Fuentes, J. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Goulden, M. L.; Kolb, Thomas E; Lavigne, M. B.; Law, B. E.; Margolis, H. A.; Martin, T.; McCaughey, J. H.; Misson, L.; Montes-Helu, M.; Noormets, A.; Randerson, J. T.; Starr, G.; Xiao, J.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, Vol. 115, No. 4, G00K02, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amiro, BD, Barr, AG, Barr, JG, Black, TA, Bracho, R, Brown, M, Chen, J, Clark, KL, Davis, KJ, Desai, AR, Dore, S, Engel, V, Fuentes, JD, Goldstein, AH, Goulden, ML, Kolb, TE, Lavigne, MB, Law, BE, Margolis, HA, Martin, T, McCaughey, JH, Misson, L, Montes-Helu, M, Noormets, A, Randerson, JT, Starr, G & Xiao, J 2010, 'Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America', Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, vol. 115, no. 4, G00K02. https://doi.org/10.1029/2010JG001390
Amiro, B. D. ; Barr, A. G. ; Barr, J. G. ; Black, T. A. ; Bracho, R. ; Brown, M. ; Chen, J. ; Clark, K. L. ; Davis, K. J. ; Desai, A. R. ; Dore, S. ; Engel, V. ; Fuentes, J. D. ; Goldstein, A. H. ; Goulden, M. L. ; Kolb, Thomas E ; Lavigne, M. B. ; Law, B. E. ; Margolis, H. A. ; Martin, T. ; McCaughey, J. H. ; Misson, L. ; Montes-Helu, M. ; Noormets, A. ; Randerson, J. T. ; Starr, G. ; Xiao, J. / Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America. In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets. 2010 ; Vol. 115, No. 4.
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AU - Bracho, R.

AU - Brown, M.

AU - Chen, J.

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AU - McCaughey, J. H.

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