Earthquakes and seismicity of the Grand Canyon region

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The seismicity of the Grand Canyon region of northern Arizona is contiguous with the Intermountain Seismic Belt of Utah. This, plus a similar recurrence rate north of the canyon (and a common style of faulting), suggests that the seismicity of the Grand Canyon region represents an extension of the Intermountain Seismic Belt of Utah. An analysis of the distribution of epicenters indicates that the majority of the events are concentrated in a rather narrow, northwest-trending band between the Mesa Butte and the West Kaibab fracture systems. This trend of activity, plus the northwestern trend of potential fault planes from the 7/4/81 event and one from the 8/31/83 event, suggest that it is the northwest-trending fracture systems, such as the Grandview-Phantom, which contain presently active faults. It seems likely that the seismicity of the Grand Canyon region is an expression of a tectonic boundary that is marked by a change in structural style as well as in crustal thickening. This seismicity is the product of an active stretching or extension of the crust. If this extension continues to affect the crust of the Colorado Plateau in the future, the tectonic boundary will continue to migrate into the interior of the plateau - eventually leaving the Grand Canyon region a seismically quiet area. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGrand Canyon geology
EditorsS.S. Beus, M. Morales
PublisherOxford University Press/Museum of Northern Arizona Press
Pages435-442
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

canyon
seismicity
earthquake
plateau
crust
tectonics
crustal thickening
active fault
earthquake epicenter
fault plane
faulting
trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Brumbaugh, D. S. (1990). Earthquakes and seismicity of the Grand Canyon region. In S. S. Beus, & M. Morales (Eds.), Grand Canyon geology (pp. 435-442). Oxford University Press/Museum of Northern Arizona Press.

Earthquakes and seismicity of the Grand Canyon region. / Brumbaugh, David S.

Grand Canyon geology. ed. / S.S. Beus; M. Morales. Oxford University Press/Museum of Northern Arizona Press, 1990. p. 435-442.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Brumbaugh, DS 1990, Earthquakes and seismicity of the Grand Canyon region. in SS Beus & M Morales (eds), Grand Canyon geology. Oxford University Press/Museum of Northern Arizona Press, pp. 435-442.
Brumbaugh DS. Earthquakes and seismicity of the Grand Canyon region. In Beus SS, Morales M, editors, Grand Canyon geology. Oxford University Press/Museum of Northern Arizona Press. 1990. p. 435-442
Brumbaugh, David S. / Earthquakes and seismicity of the Grand Canyon region. Grand Canyon geology. editor / S.S. Beus ; M. Morales. Oxford University Press/Museum of Northern Arizona Press, 1990. pp. 435-442
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