Doing and Being

Mindfulness, Health, and Quiet Ego Characteristics Among Buddhist Practitioners

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the relationship between meditation experience, psychological mindfulness, quiet ego characteristics, and self-reported physical health in a diverse sample of adults with a range of Buddhist experience (N = 117) gathered from a web-based survey administered to Buddhist practitioners around the world between August 1, 2007 and January 31, 2008. Practicing meditation on a regular basis and greater experience with Buddhism was related to higher psychological mindfulness scores. Psychological mindfulness was correlated with a latent variable called "quiet ego characteristics" that reflected measures based on Bauer and Wayment's (Transcending self-interest: psychological explorations of the quiet ego. American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, pp 7-19, 2008) conceptual and multidimensional definition of a "quiet ego": wisdom, altruism, sense of interdependence with all living things, need for structure (reversed), anger/verbal aggression (reversed), and negative affectivity (reversed). In turn, quiet ego characteristics were positively related to self-reported health. Our findings provide continuing support for the key role psychological mindfulness may play in psychological and physical well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-589
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Happiness Studies
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

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meditation
health
affectivity
experience
Buddhism
altruism
anger
interdependence
aggression
wisdom
well-being

Keywords

  • Buddhism
  • Health
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
  • Quiet ego
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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