Direct effect of advertising spending on firm value: Moderating role of financial analyst coverage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous research distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of advertising spending on firm value. This research focuses on the direct effect of advertising based on the spillover and signaling effect of advertising. Both effects are the result of increased public information flow about the firm created by advertising. Another source of public information flow about firms is information produced by financial analysts. We hypothesize that the direct effect of advertising on firm value will be stronger for firms not covered by financial analysts than for those that are covered because investors may rely on information flow from financial analysts for covered firms and rely on information flow from advertising in the absence of analyst coverage. Using financial and accounting databases for publicly traded firms for a period from 1975 to 2015, we test this hypothesis and find empirical evidence for the moderating role of analyst coverage in the relationship between advertising spending and firm value.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Research in Marketing
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Analyst coverage
Firm value
Financial analysts
Direct effect
Information flow
Public information
Hypothesis test
Spillover
Indirect effects
Investors
Empirical evidence
Data base

Keywords

  • Advertising spending
  • Analyst coverage
  • Firm value
  • Signaling
  • Spillover

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

Cite this

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abstract = "Previous research distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of advertising spending on firm value. This research focuses on the direct effect of advertising based on the spillover and signaling effect of advertising. Both effects are the result of increased public information flow about the firm created by advertising. Another source of public information flow about firms is information produced by financial analysts. We hypothesize that the direct effect of advertising on firm value will be stronger for firms not covered by financial analysts than for those that are covered because investors may rely on information flow from financial analysts for covered firms and rely on information flow from advertising in the absence of analyst coverage. Using financial and accounting databases for publicly traded firms for a period from 1975 to 2015, we test this hypothesis and find empirical evidence for the moderating role of analyst coverage in the relationship between advertising spending and firm value.",
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