Developing openness to diversity in living-learning program participants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to address how college student openness to diversity is influenced by campus environments. The contact hypothesis (Allport, 1954) provided the theoretical frame for studying 2,074 living-learning program participants and their campus environments. Results revealed that college environments accounted for a significant amount of openness to diversity variability, R2 = .32, F(2, 2027) = 20.39, p < .001. Implications for practice are to encourage peer interaction that meets contact hypothesis conditions in campus programming. Specific practice suggestions include living-learning and intensive curricular dialogue (Sáenz, Ngai, & Hurtado, 2007) programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-217
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Diversity in Higher Education
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

contact
learning
programming
dialogue
interaction
student

Keywords

  • college students
  • contact hypothesis
  • higher education
  • openness to diversity
  • peer interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Developing openness to diversity in living-learning program participants. / Longerbeam, Susan.

In: Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 201-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d6e200d79bd5457682d0a3a950585a8c,
title = "Developing openness to diversity in living-learning program participants",
abstract = "The purpose of the current study was to address how college student openness to diversity is influenced by campus environments. The contact hypothesis (Allport, 1954) provided the theoretical frame for studying 2,074 living-learning program participants and their campus environments. Results revealed that college environments accounted for a significant amount of openness to diversity variability, R2 = .32, F(2, 2027) = 20.39, p < .001. Implications for practice are to encourage peer interaction that meets contact hypothesis conditions in campus programming. Specific practice suggestions include living-learning and intensive curricular dialogue (S{\'a}enz, Ngai, & Hurtado, 2007) programs.",
keywords = "college students, contact hypothesis, higher education, openness to diversity, peer interaction",
author = "Susan Longerbeam",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1037/a0021277",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "201--217",
journal = "Journal of Diversity in Higher Education",
issn = "1938-8926",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developing openness to diversity in living-learning program participants

AU - Longerbeam, Susan

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - The purpose of the current study was to address how college student openness to diversity is influenced by campus environments. The contact hypothesis (Allport, 1954) provided the theoretical frame for studying 2,074 living-learning program participants and their campus environments. Results revealed that college environments accounted for a significant amount of openness to diversity variability, R2 = .32, F(2, 2027) = 20.39, p < .001. Implications for practice are to encourage peer interaction that meets contact hypothesis conditions in campus programming. Specific practice suggestions include living-learning and intensive curricular dialogue (Sáenz, Ngai, & Hurtado, 2007) programs.

AB - The purpose of the current study was to address how college student openness to diversity is influenced by campus environments. The contact hypothesis (Allport, 1954) provided the theoretical frame for studying 2,074 living-learning program participants and their campus environments. Results revealed that college environments accounted for a significant amount of openness to diversity variability, R2 = .32, F(2, 2027) = 20.39, p < .001. Implications for practice are to encourage peer interaction that meets contact hypothesis conditions in campus programming. Specific practice suggestions include living-learning and intensive curricular dialogue (Sáenz, Ngai, & Hurtado, 2007) programs.

KW - college students

KW - contact hypothesis

KW - higher education

KW - openness to diversity

KW - peer interaction

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650431062&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650431062&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0021277

DO - 10.1037/a0021277

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:78650431062

VL - 3

SP - 201

EP - 217

JO - Journal of Diversity in Higher Education

JF - Journal of Diversity in Higher Education

SN - 1938-8926

IS - 4

ER -