Credit spreads and merger pricing

Ding Du, Mason Gerety

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous studies (Axelson et al. in J Finance 68(6):2223–2267, 2013; Gorbenko and Malenko in J Finance 69(6):2513–2555, 2014) find that transaction prices and maximum-willingness-to-pay for targets are negatively correlated with credit market conditions. We extend the literature along two dimensions. First, we focus on takeover premiums (which account for market conditions), not transaction prices or maximum-willingness-to-pay. Second, we use predicted changes in credit spreads (which are less likely driven by confounding factors), not contemporaneous changes in credit spreads. Empirically, we find that predicted changes in the credit spread negatively impact takeover premiums, and that the correlation between predicted credit spreads and takeover premiums is not significantly different between private and public acquisitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Asset Management
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 4 2017

Fingerprint

Mergers
Pricing
Credit spreads
Takeover premium
Market conditions
Finance
Willingness-to-pay
Transaction price
Confounding
Factors
Credit markets

Keywords

  • Credit spreads
  • Merger and acquisition
  • Takeover premium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Information Systems and Management

Cite this

Credit spreads and merger pricing. / Du, Ding; Gerety, Mason.

In: Journal of Asset Management, 04.12.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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