Communication technology in international business-to-business relationships

Cristian Chelariu, Talaibek D Osmonbekov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aims to examine the antecedents and performance consequences of three types of communication technology (phone, e-mail and internet) in cross-border business-to-business relationships. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the proposed theoretical framework six hypotheses are advanced and tested. The authors use regression analysis on data from a survey of American exporters combined with secondary data on emerging European markets. Findings: This research finds that relationship-level variables are better predictors of ICT use than country-level variables, and that ICT use impacts dyadic performance. More specifically, information exchange predicted all three communication modes, while the use of warnings predicted both inter-personal communication methods. From an institutional standpoint, the authors find that bureaucratic barriers predict both phone and e-mail communication. At the firm level, it is found that firm-level technological skills are a significant predictor for the use of internet-based data exchange. The paper also finds that increased frequency of phone and e-mail communication among dyadic partners improves performance. Research limitations/implications: Although micro-level variables are found to be more important, country variables still bring interesting insights and should not be ignored. Also, newer technologies should be explored in future research. Originality/value: The authors explore antecedents of information/communication technology (ICT) use at three levels: country or macro level, dyadic (or inter-firm relationship) level, and firm capabilities (intra-firm). At the country level, the authors move beyond infrastructure to examine the impact of institutional factors, such as government red tape. At the relationship level, the authors include trust-type social norms, but extend the analysis to incorporate the use of unilateral influence attempts, such as warnings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-33
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Business and Industrial Marketing
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

International business
Business-to-business relationships
Communication
Communication technologies
Electronic mail
Technology use
Predictors
Information communication technology
Warning
World Wide Web
Social norms
Design methodology
Firm capabilities
Data exchange
Government
Regression analysis
Interfirm relationships
Interpersonal communication
Red tape
Secondary data

Keywords

  • Business-to-business
  • Communication technology
  • Europe
  • International
  • Regression
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Marketing

Cite this

Communication technology in international business-to-business relationships. / Chelariu, Cristian; Osmonbekov, Talaibek D.

In: Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 24-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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