Clinical Simulation in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing

Post-Graduation Follow Up

Mary L Lilly, Melinda Hermanns, Bill Crawley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In psychiatric-mental health, creating an innovative strategy to help students learn content that may not be frequently seen in a clinical setting is challenging. Thus, simulation helps narrow this gap. Using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's model of evaluation to guide the current study, faculty contacted baccalaureate nursing program graduates who completed a psychiatric-mental health clinical simulation scenario featuring a hanging suicide and wrist cutting suicide attempt scenario in the "Behind the Door" series as part of the clinical component of their undergraduate psychiatric-mental health course. Eleven nurses responded to a survey regarding their post-graduate encounters with these types of clinical situations, and their perception of recall and application of knowledge and skills acquired during the simulation experience to the clinical situation. Nursing graduates' responses are expressed through three major themes: emotional, contextual/behavioral, and assessment outcomes. Data from the survey indicate that nursing graduates perceived the "Behind the Door" simulations as beneficial to nursing practice. This perception is important in evaluating knowledge transfer from a simulation experience as a student into application in nursing practice. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(10), 40-45.].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-46
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services
Volume54
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Psychiatric Nursing
Psychiatry
Nursing
Mental Health
Suicide
Students
Mental Health Services
Wrist
Nurses
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

Clinical Simulation in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing : Post-Graduation Follow Up. / Lilly, Mary L; Hermanns, Melinda; Crawley, Bill.

In: Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Vol. 54, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 40-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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