Citizen science provides an efficient method for broad-scale tick-borne pathogen surveillance of ixodes pacificus and ixodes scapularis across the united states

W. Tanner Porter, Julie Wachara, Zachary A. Barrand, Nathan C. Nieto, Daniel J. Salkeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tick-borne diseases have expanded over the last 2 decades as a result of shifts in tick and pathogen distributions. These shifts have significantly increased the need for accurate portrayal of real-time pathogen distributions and prevalence in hopes of stemming increases in human morbidity. Traditionally, pathogen distribution and prevalence have been monitored through case reports or scientific collections of ticks or reservoir hosts, both of which have challenges that impact the extent, availability, and accuracy of these data. Citizen science tick collections and testing campaigns supplement these data and provide timely estimates of pathogen prevalence and distributions to help characterize and understand tick-borne disease threats to communities. We utilized our national citizen science tick collection and testing program to describe the distribution and prevalence of four Ixodes-borne pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Borrelia miyamotoi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti, across the continental United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00682-21
JournalmSphere
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Anaplasma phagocytophilum
  • Anaplasmosis
  • Babesia microti
  • Babesiosis
  • Borrelia
  • Borrelia burgdorferi
  • Borrelia miyamotoi
  • Lyme disease
  • Relapsing fever
  • Tick-borne

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

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