Chronic herbivory: Impacts on architecture and sex expression of pinyon pine

Thomas G Whitham, Susan Mopper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pinyon pine, Pinus edulis (Engelm.), in Northern Arizona is exposed to recurring high levels of herbivory by the moth Dioryctria albovitella (Hust.). During a 3-year period, infested trees experienced on average a 30 percent reduction in annual shoot production. This herbivory affects tree architecture, growth rate, reproductive output, and sexual expression. Less infested trees produce 47 percent more trunk wood, 43 percent more branch wood, and are monoecious. Architectural changes in infested trees can result in functionally male plants due to a complete loss of normal female cone-bearing ability. When herbivores are experimentally removed, normal growth and reproduction patterns resume. These strong herbivore impacts should represent a potent selection pressure in the evolution of host traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1089-1091
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume228
Issue number4703
StatePublished - 1985

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herbivores
Pinus
gender
Dioryctria
Pinus edulis
branchwood
seed cones
tree trunk
moths
reproductive performance
shoots

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Chronic herbivory : Impacts on architecture and sex expression of pinyon pine. / Whitham, Thomas G; Mopper, Susan.

In: Science, Vol. 228, No. 4703, 1985, p. 1089-1091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whitham, Thomas G ; Mopper, Susan. / Chronic herbivory : Impacts on architecture and sex expression of pinyon pine. In: Science. 1985 ; Vol. 228, No. 4703. pp. 1089-1091.
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