Chemical speciation of PM2.5 collected during prescribed fires of the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona

Marin S Robinson, Jesus Chavez, Sergio Velazquez, R. K M Jayanty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of prescribed fire is expected to increase in an effort to reduce the risk of catastrophic fire, particularly at urban/forest interfaces. Fire is a well-known source of particulate matter (PM) with particle sizes ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), small diameter PM known to affect climate, visibility, and human health. In this work, PM2.5 was collected during seven first-entry burns (flaming and smoldering stages) and one maintenance burn of the Coconino National Forest. Samples were analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, cations (sodium, potassium [K+], and ammonium [NH 4+]), anions (nitrate [NO3-] and sulfate), and 48 elements (with atomic weights between sodium and lead). The PM2.5 contained high organic carbon levels (typically >90% by mass), commonly observed ions (K+, NH4+, and NO3-) and elements (K+, chlorine, sulfur, and silicon), as well as titanium and chromium. Flaming produced higher K + and NH4+ levels than smoldering, and the elemental signature was more complex (20 versus 7 elements). Average organic carbon × 1.4 mass fractions (± standard deviation) were lower during flaming (92 ± 14%) than during smoldering (124 ± 24%). The maintenance (grassland) burn produced lower particle concentrations, lower NH4+ and NO3- levels, and higher K and chlorine levels than did the first-entry fires.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1112-1123
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Air and Waste Management Association
Volume54
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Chemical speciation
speciation (chemistry)
Fires
Particulate Matter
Chlorine
Organic carbon
chlorine
particulate matter
Sodium
organic carbon
sodium
Chromium
Silicon
Titanium
Ammonium Compounds
Sulfur
Visibility
Chemical elements
visibility
Nitrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Chemical speciation of PM2.5 collected during prescribed fires of the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona. / Robinson, Marin S; Chavez, Jesus; Velazquez, Sergio; Jayanty, R. K M.

In: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Vol. 54, No. 9, 2004, p. 1112-1123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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