Challenges to cyberfeminism voices, contradictions, and identity constructions

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

It is 5:25 on a Wednesday evening. She is the teacher. She is the authority figure. Students are filing into the room for a five-hour class on the history and theory of composition studies. She is morphing. The brown Formica tables are arranged in rows; microphones are waiting to be used. A disembodied voice announces that the broadcast will start in five minutes. She tells the operator that the camera needs to be focused on the students, not on her. She checks the computers, the pad camera, and the TV screen to make sure that students are also filing in at the other sites. She is the technology expert. While she listens to Maureen's explanation of why she needs to hand in the paper next week, she also watches the voiceless interactions of two of her off-campus students who apparently are enjoying a joke-hopefully not about her. She is a feminist but not essentially so. The theme song comes on, the students sit down, she moves to the podium, the mikes are turned on, and the show begins. Now she is also a performer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation
PublisherState University of New York Press
Pages159-176
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)0791458016, 9780791458013
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

student
joke
broadcast
song
expert
teacher
history
interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Gruber, S. (2003). Challenges to cyberfeminism voices, contradictions, and identity constructions. In Fractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation (pp. 159-176). State University of New York Press.

Challenges to cyberfeminism voices, contradictions, and identity constructions. / Gruber, Sibylle.

Fractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation. State University of New York Press, 2003. p. 159-176.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gruber, S 2003, Challenges to cyberfeminism voices, contradictions, and identity constructions. in Fractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation. State University of New York Press, pp. 159-176.
Gruber S. Challenges to cyberfeminism voices, contradictions, and identity constructions. In Fractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation. State University of New York Press. 2003. p. 159-176
Gruber, Sibylle. / Challenges to cyberfeminism voices, contradictions, and identity constructions. Fractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation. State University of New York Press, 2003. pp. 159-176
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