Cdc53p acts in concert with cdc4p and cdc34p to control the G1-to-S- phase transition and identifies a conserved family of proteins

Neal Mathias, Stephen L. Johnson, Mark Winey, Alison Adams, Loretta Goetsch, John R. Pringle, Breck Byers, Mark G. Goebl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

178 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulation of cell cycle progression occurs in part through the targeted degradation of both activating and inhibitory subunits of the cyclin- dependent kinases. During G1, CDC4, encoding a WD-40 repeat protein, and CDC34, encoding a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, are involved in the destruction of these regulators. Here we describe evidence indicating that CDC53 also is involved in this process. Mutations in CDC53 cause a phenotype indistinguishable from those of cdc4 and cdc34 mutations, numerous genetic interactions are seen between these genes, and the encoded proteins are found physically associated in vivo. Cdc53p defines a large family of proteins found in yeasts, nematodes, and humans whose molecular functions are uncharacterized. These results suggest a role for this family of proteins in regulating cell cycle proliferation through protein degradation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6634-6643
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biology
Volume16
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phase Transition
S Phase
Cell Cycle
Proteins
Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzymes
Mutation
Cyclin-Dependent Kinases
Proteolysis
Yeasts
Cell Proliferation
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Mathias, N., Johnson, S. L., Winey, M., Adams, A., Goetsch, L., Pringle, J. R., ... Goebl, M. G. (1996). Cdc53p acts in concert with cdc4p and cdc34p to control the G1-to-S- phase transition and identifies a conserved family of proteins. Molecular and Cellular Biology, 16(12), 6634-6643.

Cdc53p acts in concert with cdc4p and cdc34p to control the G1-to-S- phase transition and identifies a conserved family of proteins. / Mathias, Neal; Johnson, Stephen L.; Winey, Mark; Adams, Alison; Goetsch, Loretta; Pringle, John R.; Byers, Breck; Goebl, Mark G.

In: Molecular and Cellular Biology, Vol. 16, No. 12, 1996, p. 6634-6643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathias, N, Johnson, SL, Winey, M, Adams, A, Goetsch, L, Pringle, JR, Byers, B & Goebl, MG 1996, 'Cdc53p acts in concert with cdc4p and cdc34p to control the G1-to-S- phase transition and identifies a conserved family of proteins', Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 16, no. 12, pp. 6634-6643.
Mathias, Neal ; Johnson, Stephen L. ; Winey, Mark ; Adams, Alison ; Goetsch, Loretta ; Pringle, John R. ; Byers, Breck ; Goebl, Mark G. / Cdc53p acts in concert with cdc4p and cdc34p to control the G1-to-S- phase transition and identifies a conserved family of proteins. In: Molecular and Cellular Biology. 1996 ; Vol. 16, No. 12. pp. 6634-6643.
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