Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area?

Thomas G. McPoil, Mathew Haager, John Hilt, John Klapheke, Ray Martinez, Cory van Steenwyk, Nicholas Weber, Mark W Cornwall, Michael Bade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The intent of this study was to determine if the use of a single or combination of static foot posture measurements can be used to predict rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot plantar surface area in individuals with pronated or normal foot types. Methods: Twelve foot measurements were collected on 52 individuals (mean age 25.8 years) with the change in midfoot width used to place subjects in a pronated or normal foot mobility group. Dynamic plantar contact area was collected during walking with a pressure sensor platform. The 12 measures were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measures associated with regional plantar surface area. Results: A two variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measurements and forefoot plantar contact area (r2=0.79, p<0.0001). A four variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measurements and midfoot plantar contact area (r2=0.85, p<0.0001) in those individuals with a 1.26cm or greater change in midfoot width. Conclusions: The results indicate that clinicians can use a combination of simple, reliable and time efficient foot measures to explain 79% and 85% of the plantar surface area in the forefoot and midfoot, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-168
Number of pages8
JournalFoot
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Posture
Foot
Walking
Regression Analysis
Pressure

Keywords

  • Foot mobility
  • Foot posture
  • Plantar surface area
  • Reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Podiatry

Cite this

McPoil, T. G., Haager, M., Hilt, J., Klapheke, J., Martinez, R., van Steenwyk, C., ... Bade, M. (2014). Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area? Foot, 24(4), 161-168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foot.2014.07.003

Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area? / McPoil, Thomas G.; Haager, Mathew; Hilt, John; Klapheke, John; Martinez, Ray; van Steenwyk, Cory; Weber, Nicholas; Cornwall, Mark W; Bade, Michael.

In: Foot, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2014, p. 161-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McPoil, TG, Haager, M, Hilt, J, Klapheke, J, Martinez, R, van Steenwyk, C, Weber, N, Cornwall, MW & Bade, M 2014, 'Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area?', Foot, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 161-168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foot.2014.07.003
McPoil TG, Haager M, Hilt J, Klapheke J, Martinez R, van Steenwyk C et al. Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area? Foot. 2014;24(4):161-168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foot.2014.07.003
McPoil, Thomas G. ; Haager, Mathew ; Hilt, John ; Klapheke, John ; Martinez, Ray ; van Steenwyk, Cory ; Weber, Nicholas ; Cornwall, Mark W ; Bade, Michael. / Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area?. In: Foot. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 161-168.
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