Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area?

Thomas G. McPoil, Mathew Haager, John Hilt, John Klapheke, Ray Martinez, Cory van Steenwyk, Nicholas Weber, Mark W Cornwall, Michael Bade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The intent of this study was to determine if the use of a single or combination of static foot posture measurements can be used to predict rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot plantar surface area in individuals with pronated or normal foot types. Methods: Twelve foot measurements were collected on 52 individuals (mean age 25.8 years) with the change in midfoot width used to place subjects in a pronated or normal foot mobility group. Dynamic plantar contact area was collected during walking with a pressure sensor platform. The 12 measures were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measures associated with regional plantar surface area. Results: A two variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measurements and forefoot plantar contact area (r2=0.79, p<0.0001). A four variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measurements and midfoot plantar contact area (r2=0.85, p<0.0001) in those individuals with a 1.26cm or greater change in midfoot width. Conclusions: The results indicate that clinicians can use a combination of simple, reliable and time efficient foot measures to explain 79% and 85% of the plantar surface area in the forefoot and midfoot, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-168
Number of pages8
JournalFoot
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Keywords

  • Foot mobility
  • Foot posture
  • Plantar surface area
  • Reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Podiatry

Cite this

McPoil, T. G., Haager, M., Hilt, J., Klapheke, J., Martinez, R., van Steenwyk, C., Weber, N., Cornwall, M. W., & Bade, M. (2014). Can static foot posture measurements predict regional plantar surface area? Foot, 24(4), 161-168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foot.2014.07.003