C-reactive protein response to a vegan lifestyle intervention

Jay T. Sutliffe, Lori D. Wilson, Hendrik de Heer, Ray L. Foster, Mary Jo Carnot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This brief lifestyle intervention, including a vegan diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and various legumes, nuts and seeds, significantly improved health risk factors and reduced systemic inflammation as measured by circulating CRP. The degree of improvement was associated with baseline CRP such that higher levels predicted greater decreases. The interaction between gender and baseline CRP was significant and showed that males with higher baseline CRP levels appeared to have a more robust decrease in CRP due to the intervention than did their female counterparts.It is likely that the vegetable and high fiber content of a vegan diet reduces CRP in the presences of obesity. Neither the quantity of exercise nor the length of stay was significant predictors of CRP reduction. Additionally, those participants who had a vegan diet prior to the intervention had the lowest CRP risk coming into the program. Direct measure of body fat composition, estrogen and other inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 and TNF-alpha would enhance current understanding of the specific mechanisms of CRP reduction related to lifestyle interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-37
Number of pages6
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

C-Reactive Protein
Life Style
Vegetables
Nuts
Body Composition
Fabaceae
Adipose Tissue
Interleukin-6
Fruit
Length of Stay
Seeds
Estrogens
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Obesity
Exercise
Inflammation
Health
Vegan Diet
Vegans
Whole Grains

Keywords

  • CRP
  • Inflammation
  • Lifestyle intervention
  • Vegan diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Complementary and Manual Therapy

Cite this

C-reactive protein response to a vegan lifestyle intervention. / Sutliffe, Jay T.; Wilson, Lori D.; de Heer, Hendrik; Foster, Ray L.; Carnot, Mary Jo.

In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 32-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutliffe, Jay T. ; Wilson, Lori D. ; de Heer, Hendrik ; Foster, Ray L. ; Carnot, Mary Jo. / C-reactive protein response to a vegan lifestyle intervention. In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 32-37.
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