Breeding bird responses to three silvicultural treatments in the Oregon Coast Range

Carol L Chambers, William C. McComb, John C. Tappeiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Silvicultural alternatives to clear-cutting have been suggested to promote development, retention, or creation of late-successional features such as large trees, multilayered canopies, snags, and logs. We assessed bird response to three silvicultural alternatives to clear-cutting that retained structural features found in old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests and that imitated natural disturbance regimes more closely than did traditional clear-cutting: (1) small-patch group selection treatment representing a low-intensity disturbance; (2) two-story treatment, representing a moderate to high-intensity disturbance; and (3) modified clear-cut treatment, representing a high-intensity disturbance. We counted diurnal breeding birds 1 yr prior to and 2 yr after harvest to estimate effects of the silvicultural treatments on bird communities compared with uncut controls. The small-patch group selection treatment was most similar in species composition to control stands. The two-story treatment was more similar to the modified clear-cut treatment. Ten bird species remained abundant following the small-patch group selection treatment. They declined in abundance in modified clearcuts and two-story stands. These species included four neotropical migratory species and five species with restricted geographic ranges and habitat associations. Nine species increased in response to moderate and/or high-intensity disturbances. This group included a larger proportion of species that were habitat generalists. Silvicultural treatments imitating low-intensity disturbances were most effective in retaining bird communities associated with mature forest; high-intensity disturbances such as the two-story and modified clear-cut treatments greatly altered bird community composition. Bird responses to the silvicultural treatments that we studied indicate that a variety of stand types is needed to meet needs of all species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-185
Number of pages15
JournalEcological Applications
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

disturbance
clearcutting
group selection
coast
bird
migratory species
snag
habitat
breeding bird
generalist
community composition
canopy

Keywords

  • Bird communities
  • Forest management
  • Green tree retention
  • Natural disturbance regimes
  • Neotropical migratory birds
  • New forestry
  • Oregon Coast Range
  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Silviculture
  • Uneven-aged management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Breeding bird responses to three silvicultural treatments in the Oregon Coast Range. / Chambers, Carol L; McComb, William C.; Tappeiner, John C.

In: Ecological Applications, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1999, p. 171-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chambers, Carol L ; McComb, William C. ; Tappeiner, John C. / Breeding bird responses to three silvicultural treatments in the Oregon Coast Range. In: Ecological Applications. 1999 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 171-185.
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