Botulinum toxin injections as a method for chemically denervating skeletal muscle to test functional hypotheses: A pilot study in Lepomis cyanellus

Matthew W. O'Neill, Alice C Gibb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we demonstrate that botulinum toxin can be used to chemically denervate muscles to test functional hypotheses. We injected research-grade type A botulinum toxin complex into pectoral fin abductors (abductor superficialis) of green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) to determine whether chemical denervation would eliminate the ability of a particular muscle to contribute to overall pectoral fin movements. Reduction of target muscle activity occurred within 8 d of the injection, and paralysis was confirmed using electromyography. No paralysis was seen in the adjacent muscles (abductor profundus) or in positive controls (saline injections). Paralysis occurred more slowly and at lower doses than previously documented for mammals. However, botulinum toxin complex (500 kDa) was used here, whereas previous studies have used purified toxin (150 kDa). Therefore, differences in physiological responses between fish and mammals cannot yet be distinguished from differences caused by the toxin type. However, we note that the toxin complex is less likely to diffuse across muscle fascia (because it is large), which should minimize paralytic effects on adjacent muscles. We suggest that botulinum toxin holds great promise as a chemical denervation agent in functional studies of animal locomotion and feeding behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-249
Number of pages9
JournalPhysiological and Biochemical Zoology
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Fingerprint

Lepomis cyanellus
botulinum toxin
Botulinum Toxins
Muscle
skeletal muscle
Skeletal Muscle
injection
Muscles
muscles
Injections
paralysis
Paralysis
Mammals
toxins
testing
Denervation
fins
methodology
mammals
Perciformes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{2f324938382b44a3b9fc04b0ac10905f,
title = "Botulinum toxin injections as a method for chemically denervating skeletal muscle to test functional hypotheses: A pilot study in Lepomis cyanellus",
abstract = "In this study, we demonstrate that botulinum toxin can be used to chemically denervate muscles to test functional hypotheses. We injected research-grade type A botulinum toxin complex into pectoral fin abductors (abductor superficialis) of green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) to determine whether chemical denervation would eliminate the ability of a particular muscle to contribute to overall pectoral fin movements. Reduction of target muscle activity occurred within 8 d of the injection, and paralysis was confirmed using electromyography. No paralysis was seen in the adjacent muscles (abductor profundus) or in positive controls (saline injections). Paralysis occurred more slowly and at lower doses than previously documented for mammals. However, botulinum toxin complex (500 kDa) was used here, whereas previous studies have used purified toxin (150 kDa). Therefore, differences in physiological responses between fish and mammals cannot yet be distinguished from differences caused by the toxin type. However, we note that the toxin complex is less likely to diffuse across muscle fascia (because it is large), which should minimize paralytic effects on adjacent muscles. We suggest that botulinum toxin holds great promise as a chemical denervation agent in functional studies of animal locomotion and feeding behaviors.",
author = "O'Neill, {Matthew W.} and Gibb, {Alice C}",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1086/510636",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "80",
pages = "241--249",
journal = "Physiological and Biochemical Zoology",
issn = "1522-2152",
publisher = "University of Chicago",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Botulinum toxin injections as a method for chemically denervating skeletal muscle to test functional hypotheses

T2 - A pilot study in Lepomis cyanellus

AU - O'Neill, Matthew W.

AU - Gibb, Alice C

PY - 2007/3

Y1 - 2007/3

N2 - In this study, we demonstrate that botulinum toxin can be used to chemically denervate muscles to test functional hypotheses. We injected research-grade type A botulinum toxin complex into pectoral fin abductors (abductor superficialis) of green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) to determine whether chemical denervation would eliminate the ability of a particular muscle to contribute to overall pectoral fin movements. Reduction of target muscle activity occurred within 8 d of the injection, and paralysis was confirmed using electromyography. No paralysis was seen in the adjacent muscles (abductor profundus) or in positive controls (saline injections). Paralysis occurred more slowly and at lower doses than previously documented for mammals. However, botulinum toxin complex (500 kDa) was used here, whereas previous studies have used purified toxin (150 kDa). Therefore, differences in physiological responses between fish and mammals cannot yet be distinguished from differences caused by the toxin type. However, we note that the toxin complex is less likely to diffuse across muscle fascia (because it is large), which should minimize paralytic effects on adjacent muscles. We suggest that botulinum toxin holds great promise as a chemical denervation agent in functional studies of animal locomotion and feeding behaviors.

AB - In this study, we demonstrate that botulinum toxin can be used to chemically denervate muscles to test functional hypotheses. We injected research-grade type A botulinum toxin complex into pectoral fin abductors (abductor superficialis) of green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) to determine whether chemical denervation would eliminate the ability of a particular muscle to contribute to overall pectoral fin movements. Reduction of target muscle activity occurred within 8 d of the injection, and paralysis was confirmed using electromyography. No paralysis was seen in the adjacent muscles (abductor profundus) or in positive controls (saline injections). Paralysis occurred more slowly and at lower doses than previously documented for mammals. However, botulinum toxin complex (500 kDa) was used here, whereas previous studies have used purified toxin (150 kDa). Therefore, differences in physiological responses between fish and mammals cannot yet be distinguished from differences caused by the toxin type. However, we note that the toxin complex is less likely to diffuse across muscle fascia (because it is large), which should minimize paralytic effects on adjacent muscles. We suggest that botulinum toxin holds great promise as a chemical denervation agent in functional studies of animal locomotion and feeding behaviors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847017311&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33847017311&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/510636

DO - 10.1086/510636

M3 - Article

C2 - 17252520

AN - SCOPUS:33847017311

VL - 80

SP - 241

EP - 249

JO - Physiological and Biochemical Zoology

JF - Physiological and Biochemical Zoology

SN - 1522-2152

IS - 2

ER -