Beyond the Casino

Sustainable tourism and cultural development on native American lands

Judie M. Piner, Thomas Paradis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An increasing number of American-Indian tribes have turned to high-profile casino developments to stimulate desperate local economies. This case study of the Yavapai-Apache Nation's experience with Indian gaming in central Arizona highlights the necessity for tribes to view the casino as one component of a more comprehensive, long-term development strategy. While casino projects themselves gain the immediate attention of many researchers, few studies have focused on the process of long-term tribal planning and development initiatives made possible by relatively short-term casino revenues. This qualitative analysis investigates beyond the tribe's successful Cliff Castle Casino to understand the decision-making process embedded within its internal government structure. Central to this process was a long-term vision of tribal leaders that focused less on immediate use of casino revenues and more on tribal empowerment, cultural awareness and sustainable economic development. Various tourism initiatives have figured prominently in this long-term scenario, given the tribe's location in Arizona's amenity-rich Verde Valley.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-98
Number of pages19
JournalTourism Geographies
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 2004

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cultural development
local economy
qualitative analysis
tourism development
ecotourism
empowerment
amenity
development strategy
cliff
ethnic group
economic development
tourism
Tourism
decision making
valley
revenue
American Indian
decision-making process
leader
scenario

Keywords

  • Arizona
  • Indian gaming
  • Sustainable tourism development
  • Yavapai-Apache nation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Beyond the Casino : Sustainable tourism and cultural development on native American lands. / Piner, Judie M.; Paradis, Thomas.

In: Tourism Geographies, Vol. 6, No. 1, 02.2004, p. 80-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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