Beyond basic study skills: The use of technology for success in college

William H. Huffman, Ann Hergatt Huffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Technology has become a fundamental component of both education and work. Yet regardless of perceived benefits, in many cases students do not use technology effectively. One challenge educators confront is how to motivate students to effectively use the technological mediums provided in their classes. The goal of the current study is twofold: to use the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to examine two motivators of behavior, ease of use and perceived need, and to assess how they affect students' likelihood of effectively using technology. Second, we evaluate how the match between expectations of the use of technology and the actual student use affect actual classroom performance. To test our hypotheses, college students (N = 384) in introductory psychology classes completed a survey. We also obtained the instructor's perceptions of the need for technology in their class and students' final class grades. Results showed that ease of use and perceived need of technology were related to the frequency of computer use and intentions to use technology. Additionally, findings suggested that technology use, specifically technology deemed important by the instructor, was related to academic success (i.e.; final grade in class).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-590
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Keywords

  • Computer anxiety
  • Computer support
  • Computer use
  • Intentions to use technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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