Beliefs about AIDS in five Latin and Anglo-American populations: The role of the biomedical model

Roberta D. Baer, Susan C. Weller, Lee Pachter, Robert Trotter, Javier Garcia De Alba Garcia, Mark Glazer, Robert Klein, Tracey Lockaby, Janice Nichols, Roger Parrish, Bruce Randall, Jeanette Reid, Susan W. Morfit, Morfit Van Morfit

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Abstract

This paper focuses on variability in beliefs about AIDS among Latin Americans, as compared with middle class Americans. Four geographically dispersed groups of Latin Americans were chosen for study as well as a middle class, largely Anglo-American population. Coherent sets of beliefs were found at each site, and despite tremendous variability among the five populations, beliefs were remarkably similar across sites. The biomedical model is widely shared, and the critical variable in the extent to which it is understood is community prevalence of AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-29
Number of pages17
JournalAnthropology and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Baer, R. D., Weller, S. C., Pachter, L., Trotter, R., De Alba Garcia, J. G., Glazer, M., Klein, R., Lockaby, T., Nichols, J., Parrish, R., Randall, B., Reid, J., Morfit, S. W., & Van Morfit, M. (1999). Beliefs about AIDS in five Latin and Anglo-American populations: The role of the biomedical model. Anthropology and Medicine, 6(1), 13-29. https://doi.org/10.1080/13648470.1999.9964572