Avoiding negative dysphagia outcomes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dysphagia in adults affects their quality of life and can lead to life-threatening conditions. The authors draw on both 30 years of experience as clinicians and also on expert testimony in adult, dysphagia-malpractice cases to make five recommendations with the aim of preventing dysphagia-related deaths. They discuss the importance of informed consent documents and suggest the following nursing actions to reduce these often unnecessary tragedies: consider the importance of diet status; understand and follow speech-language-pathologists' recommendations; be familiar with the dysphagia assessment; be responsive to the need for an instrumental assessment; and ensure dysphagia communication is accurate and disseminated among healthcare professionals. They conclude that most negative dysphagia-management outcomes can be prevented and that nurses play a pivotal role in this prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1
Number of pages1
JournalOnline Journal of Issues in Nursing
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Deglutition Disorders
Consent Forms
Needs Assessment
Malpractice
Expert Testimony
Nursing
Language
Nurses
Communication
Quality of Life
Diet
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • Dysphagia
  • Dysphagia assessment
  • Dysphagia treatment
  • Dysphagia-related deaths
  • Electronic charting
  • Healthcare team
  • Informed consent
  • Interdisciplinary communication
  • Malpractice
  • Nutrition
  • Rehabilitation
  • Safety
  • Speech-language pathologist
  • Swallowing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects

Cite this

Avoiding negative dysphagia outcomes. / Tanner, Dennis C; Culbertson, William R.

In: Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2014, p. 1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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