Association of the functional movement screen with injuries in division I athletes

Meghan Warren, Craig A. Smith, Nicole J. Chimera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition. Objective: To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: College athletic facilities. Participants: 167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/ diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89). Intervention: The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination. Main Outcome Measure: Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season. Results: FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53-1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury. Conclusion: FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-170
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Athletes
Wounds and Injuries
Cumulative Trauma Disorders
Sports
Track and Field
Odds Ratio
Volleyball
Golf
Tennis
Basketball
Athletic Injuries
Diving
Soccer
Football
ROC Curve
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • FMS
  • Fundamental movement
  • Movement stability
  • Sports medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Association of the functional movement screen with injuries in division I athletes. / Warren, Meghan; Smith, Craig A.; Chimera, Nicole J.

In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2015, p. 163-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Warren, Meghan ; Smith, Craig A. ; Chimera, Nicole J. / Association of the functional movement screen with injuries in division I athletes. In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 163-170.
@article{3a050c3bf55a42b3afa721e9884d8cbf,
title = "Association of the functional movement screen with injuries in division I athletes",
abstract = "Context: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition. Objective: To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: College athletic facilities. Participants: 167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/ diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89). Intervention: The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination. Main Outcome Measure: Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season. Results: FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95{\%} CI 0.53-1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95{\%} CI 0.08-0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury. Conclusion: FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.",
keywords = "FMS, Fundamental movement, Movement stability, Sports medicine",
author = "Meghan Warren and Smith, {Craig A.} and Chimera, {Nicole J.}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1123/jsr.2013-0141",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "163--170",
journal = "Journal of Sport Rehabilitation",
issn = "1056-6716",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of the functional movement screen with injuries in division I athletes

AU - Warren, Meghan

AU - Smith, Craig A.

AU - Chimera, Nicole J.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Context: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition. Objective: To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: College athletic facilities. Participants: 167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/ diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89). Intervention: The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination. Main Outcome Measure: Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season. Results: FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53-1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury. Conclusion: FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

AB - Context: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition. Objective: To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: College athletic facilities. Participants: 167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/ diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89). Intervention: The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination. Main Outcome Measure: Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season. Results: FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53-1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury. Conclusion: FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

KW - FMS

KW - Fundamental movement

KW - Movement stability

KW - Sports medicine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930239899&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930239899&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/jsr.2013-0141

DO - 10.1123/jsr.2013-0141

M3 - Article

C2 - 25203695

AN - SCOPUS:84930239899

VL - 24

SP - 163

EP - 170

JO - Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

SN - 1056-6716

IS - 2

ER -