Association and dose-response relationship of self-reported physical activity and disability among adults ≥50 years: National health and nutrition examination survey, 2011-2016

Margaret Delaney, Meghan Warren, Brian Kinslow, Hendrik De Heer, Kathleen Ganley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Disability is a tremendous public health challenge. No study has assessed whether meeting U.S. Physical Activity guidelines is associated with disability in mobility tasks, activities of daily living, and social participation among U.S. older adults. Using 2011-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, this study examined this relationship among 8,309 individuals aged ≥50 years. Most participants (n = 4,272) did not achieve guidelines, and 2,912 participants were completely inactive. People who did not meet guidelines had higher odds of disability compared with those who did (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80) in addition to difficulty with mobility tasks (AOR = 1.85), activities of daily living (AOR = 1.66), and social participation (AOR = 2.09). There was a dose-response effect for each level of activity (inactive, insufficient, and meeting and exceeding recommendations). Among adults aged ≥50 years, meeting the U.S. guidelines was associated with better social and physical functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-441
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Exercise
  • Physical functioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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