Arthropod communities on hybrid and parental cottonwoods are phylogenetically structured by tree type: Implications for conservation of biodiversity in plant hybrid zones

Karl J. Jarvis, Gerard J Allan, Ashley J. Craig, Rebecca K. Beresic-Perrins, Gina Wimp, Catherine A Gehring, Thomas G Whitham

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although hybridization in plants has been recognized as an important pathway in plant speciation, it may also affect the ecology and evolution of associated communities. Cottonwood species (Populus angustifolia and P. fremontii) and their naturally occurring hybrids are known to support different plant, animal, and microbial communities, but no studies have examined community structure within the context of phylogenetic history. Using a community composed of 199 arthropod species, we tested for differences in arthropod phylogenetic patterns within and among hybrid and parental tree types in a common garden. Three major patterns emerged. (1) Phylogenetic diversity (PD) was significantly different between arthropod communities on hybrids and Fremont cottonwood when pooled by tree type. (2) Mean phylogenetic distance (MPD) and net relatedness index (NRI) indicated that communities on hybrid trees were significantly more phylogenetically overdispersed than communities on either parental tree type. (3) Community distance (Dpw) indicated that communities on hybrids were significantly different than parental species. Our results show that arthropod communities on parental and hybrid cottonwoods exhibit significantly different patterns of phylogenetic structure. This suggests that arthropod community assembly is driven, in part, by plant-arthropod interactions at the level of cottonwood tree type. We discuss potential hypotheses to explain the effect of plant genetic dissimilarity on arthropod phylogenetic community structure, including the role of competition and environmental filtering. Our findings suggest that cottonwood species and their hybrids function as evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) that affect the assembly and composition of associated arthropod communities and deserve high priority for conservation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEcology and Evolution
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

arthropod communities
hybrid zone
arthropod
biodiversity
phylogenetics
arthropods
phylogeny
Populus fremontii
community structure
Populus angustifolia
plant genetics
animal community
gardens
microbial communities
relatedness
plant communities
garden
hybridization
microbial community
plant community

Keywords

  • Arthropod phylogenetics
  • Common garden
  • Community genetics
  • Community phylogenetics
  • Foundation species
  • Hybridization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

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title = "Arthropod communities on hybrid and parental cottonwoods are phylogenetically structured by tree type: Implications for conservation of biodiversity in plant hybrid zones",
abstract = "Although hybridization in plants has been recognized as an important pathway in plant speciation, it may also affect the ecology and evolution of associated communities. Cottonwood species (Populus angustifolia and P. fremontii) and their naturally occurring hybrids are known to support different plant, animal, and microbial communities, but no studies have examined community structure within the context of phylogenetic history. Using a community composed of 199 arthropod species, we tested for differences in arthropod phylogenetic patterns within and among hybrid and parental tree types in a common garden. Three major patterns emerged. (1) Phylogenetic diversity (PD) was significantly different between arthropod communities on hybrids and Fremont cottonwood when pooled by tree type. (2) Mean phylogenetic distance (MPD) and net relatedness index (NRI) indicated that communities on hybrid trees were significantly more phylogenetically overdispersed than communities on either parental tree type. (3) Community distance (Dpw) indicated that communities on hybrids were significantly different than parental species. Our results show that arthropod communities on parental and hybrid cottonwoods exhibit significantly different patterns of phylogenetic structure. This suggests that arthropod community assembly is driven, in part, by plant-arthropod interactions at the level of cottonwood tree type. We discuss potential hypotheses to explain the effect of plant genetic dissimilarity on arthropod phylogenetic community structure, including the role of competition and environmental filtering. Our findings suggest that cottonwood species and their hybrids function as evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) that affect the assembly and composition of associated arthropod communities and deserve high priority for conservation.",
keywords = "Arthropod phylogenetics, Common garden, Community genetics, Community phylogenetics, Foundation species, Hybridization",
author = "Jarvis, {Karl J.} and Allan, {Gerard J} and Craig, {Ashley J.} and Beresic-Perrins, {Rebecca K.} and Gina Wimp and Gehring, {Catherine A} and Whitham, {Thomas G}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1002/ece3.3146",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "2045-7758",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Arthropod communities on hybrid and parental cottonwoods are phylogenetically structured by tree type

T2 - Implications for conservation of biodiversity in plant hybrid zones

AU - Jarvis, Karl J.

AU - Allan, Gerard J

AU - Craig, Ashley J.

AU - Beresic-Perrins, Rebecca K.

AU - Wimp, Gina

AU - Gehring, Catherine A

AU - Whitham, Thomas G

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Although hybridization in plants has been recognized as an important pathway in plant speciation, it may also affect the ecology and evolution of associated communities. Cottonwood species (Populus angustifolia and P. fremontii) and their naturally occurring hybrids are known to support different plant, animal, and microbial communities, but no studies have examined community structure within the context of phylogenetic history. Using a community composed of 199 arthropod species, we tested for differences in arthropod phylogenetic patterns within and among hybrid and parental tree types in a common garden. Three major patterns emerged. (1) Phylogenetic diversity (PD) was significantly different between arthropod communities on hybrids and Fremont cottonwood when pooled by tree type. (2) Mean phylogenetic distance (MPD) and net relatedness index (NRI) indicated that communities on hybrid trees were significantly more phylogenetically overdispersed than communities on either parental tree type. (3) Community distance (Dpw) indicated that communities on hybrids were significantly different than parental species. Our results show that arthropod communities on parental and hybrid cottonwoods exhibit significantly different patterns of phylogenetic structure. This suggests that arthropod community assembly is driven, in part, by plant-arthropod interactions at the level of cottonwood tree type. We discuss potential hypotheses to explain the effect of plant genetic dissimilarity on arthropod phylogenetic community structure, including the role of competition and environmental filtering. Our findings suggest that cottonwood species and their hybrids function as evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) that affect the assembly and composition of associated arthropod communities and deserve high priority for conservation.

AB - Although hybridization in plants has been recognized as an important pathway in plant speciation, it may also affect the ecology and evolution of associated communities. Cottonwood species (Populus angustifolia and P. fremontii) and their naturally occurring hybrids are known to support different plant, animal, and microbial communities, but no studies have examined community structure within the context of phylogenetic history. Using a community composed of 199 arthropod species, we tested for differences in arthropod phylogenetic patterns within and among hybrid and parental tree types in a common garden. Three major patterns emerged. (1) Phylogenetic diversity (PD) was significantly different between arthropod communities on hybrids and Fremont cottonwood when pooled by tree type. (2) Mean phylogenetic distance (MPD) and net relatedness index (NRI) indicated that communities on hybrid trees were significantly more phylogenetically overdispersed than communities on either parental tree type. (3) Community distance (Dpw) indicated that communities on hybrids were significantly different than parental species. Our results show that arthropod communities on parental and hybrid cottonwoods exhibit significantly different patterns of phylogenetic structure. This suggests that arthropod community assembly is driven, in part, by plant-arthropod interactions at the level of cottonwood tree type. We discuss potential hypotheses to explain the effect of plant genetic dissimilarity on arthropod phylogenetic community structure, including the role of competition and environmental filtering. Our findings suggest that cottonwood species and their hybrids function as evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) that affect the assembly and composition of associated arthropod communities and deserve high priority for conservation.

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KW - Community genetics

KW - Community phylogenetics

KW - Foundation species

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