Arch height change during sit-to-stand

An alternative for the navicular drop test

Thomas G. McPoil, Mark W Cornwall, Lynn Medoff, Bill Vicenzino, Kelly Forsberg, Dana Hilz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A study was conducted to determine the reliability and validity of a new foot mobility assessment method that utilizes digital images to measure the change in dorsal arch height measured at 50% of the length of the foot during the Sit-to-Stand test.Methods: Two hundred - seventy five healthy participants participated in the study. The medial aspect of each foot was photographed with a digital camera while each participant stood with 50% body weight on each foot as well as in sitting for a non-weight bearing image. The dorsal arch height was measured at 50% of the total length of the foot on both weight bearing and non-weight bearing images to determine the change in dorsal arch height. The reliability and validity of the measurements were then determined.Results: The mean difference in dorsal arch height between non-weight bearing and weight bearing was 10 millimeters. The change in arch height during the Sit-to-Stand test was shown to have good to high levels of intra- and inter-reliability as well as validity using x-rays as the criterion measure.Conclusion: While the navicular drop test has been widely used as a clinical method to assess foot mobility, poor levels of inter-rater reliability have been reported. The results of the current study suggest that the change in dorsal arch height during the Sit-to-Stand test offers the clinician a reliable and valid alternative to the navicular drop test.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Research
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 28 2008

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Foot
Weight-Bearing
Reproducibility of Results
Healthy Volunteers
Body Weight
X-Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Arch height change during sit-to-stand : An alternative for the navicular drop test. / McPoil, Thomas G.; Cornwall, Mark W; Medoff, Lynn; Vicenzino, Bill; Forsberg, Kelly; Hilz, Dana.

In: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, Vol. 1, No. 1, 3, 28.07.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McPoil, Thomas G. ; Cornwall, Mark W ; Medoff, Lynn ; Vicenzino, Bill ; Forsberg, Kelly ; Hilz, Dana. / Arch height change during sit-to-stand : An alternative for the navicular drop test. In: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research. 2008 ; Vol. 1, No. 1.
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