Apple fruit infested with codling moth are more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae and possess increased amounts of (E,E)-α-farnesene

Peter J. Landolt, Jewel A. Brumley, Connie L. Smithhisler, Lisa L. Biddick, Richard Hofstetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Apple fruit artificially infested with codling moth larvae attracted significantly more neonate larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella than uninfested fruit. A greater number of larvae responded to odor in an olfactometer from codling moth-infested cold-stored Red Delicious thinning apples than uninfested apples. Immature Granny Smith, Red Delicious, or Golden Delicious apples that were infested on the tree for five days by codling moth larvae were more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae than similar but uninfested fruit of the same varieties. Apples infested on the tree and sampled five days later also contained significantly greater amounts of the larval attractant (E,E)-α-farnesene, compared to uninfested apples. Other types of injury to apple fruit did not produce results similar to that from codling moth infestation, either in increased attractiveness to codling moth larvae or in increased quantities of (E,E)-α-farnesene. These results are consistent with the reported attractiveness of (E,E)-α-farnesene to neonate codling moth larvae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1685-1699
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

farnesene
Cydia pomonella
Moths
neonate
Malus
Fruits
moth
Larva
insect larvae
Fruit
neonates
fruit
apples
larva
fruits
Odors
attractant
olfactometers
larvae
attractants

Keywords

  • α-farnesene
  • Apple
  • Attraction
  • Behavior
  • Codling moth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Ecology

Cite this

Apple fruit infested with codling moth are more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae and possess increased amounts of (E,E)-α-farnesene. / Landolt, Peter J.; Brumley, Jewel A.; Smithhisler, Connie L.; Biddick, Lisa L.; Hofstetter, Richard.

In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 26, No. 7, 2000, p. 1685-1699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landolt, Peter J. ; Brumley, Jewel A. ; Smithhisler, Connie L. ; Biddick, Lisa L. ; Hofstetter, Richard. / Apple fruit infested with codling moth are more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae and possess increased amounts of (E,E)-α-farnesene. In: Journal of Chemical Ecology. 2000 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 1685-1699.
@article{c3b8be02f5424fe484c3a8c2549ff6a0,
title = "Apple fruit infested with codling moth are more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae and possess increased amounts of (E,E)-α-farnesene",
abstract = "Apple fruit artificially infested with codling moth larvae attracted significantly more neonate larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella than uninfested fruit. A greater number of larvae responded to odor in an olfactometer from codling moth-infested cold-stored Red Delicious thinning apples than uninfested apples. Immature Granny Smith, Red Delicious, or Golden Delicious apples that were infested on the tree for five days by codling moth larvae were more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae than similar but uninfested fruit of the same varieties. Apples infested on the tree and sampled five days later also contained significantly greater amounts of the larval attractant (E,E)-α-farnesene, compared to uninfested apples. Other types of injury to apple fruit did not produce results similar to that from codling moth infestation, either in increased attractiveness to codling moth larvae or in increased quantities of (E,E)-α-farnesene. These results are consistent with the reported attractiveness of (E,E)-α-farnesene to neonate codling moth larvae.",
keywords = "α-farnesene, Apple, Attraction, Behavior, Codling moth",
author = "Landolt, {Peter J.} and Brumley, {Jewel A.} and Smithhisler, {Connie L.} and Biddick, {Lisa L.} and Richard Hofstetter",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1023/A:1005595014589",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "1685--1699",
journal = "Journal of Chemical Ecology",
issn = "0098-0331",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Apple fruit infested with codling moth are more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae and possess increased amounts of (E,E)-α-farnesene

AU - Landolt, Peter J.

AU - Brumley, Jewel A.

AU - Smithhisler, Connie L.

AU - Biddick, Lisa L.

AU - Hofstetter, Richard

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Apple fruit artificially infested with codling moth larvae attracted significantly more neonate larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella than uninfested fruit. A greater number of larvae responded to odor in an olfactometer from codling moth-infested cold-stored Red Delicious thinning apples than uninfested apples. Immature Granny Smith, Red Delicious, or Golden Delicious apples that were infested on the tree for five days by codling moth larvae were more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae than similar but uninfested fruit of the same varieties. Apples infested on the tree and sampled five days later also contained significantly greater amounts of the larval attractant (E,E)-α-farnesene, compared to uninfested apples. Other types of injury to apple fruit did not produce results similar to that from codling moth infestation, either in increased attractiveness to codling moth larvae or in increased quantities of (E,E)-α-farnesene. These results are consistent with the reported attractiveness of (E,E)-α-farnesene to neonate codling moth larvae.

AB - Apple fruit artificially infested with codling moth larvae attracted significantly more neonate larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella than uninfested fruit. A greater number of larvae responded to odor in an olfactometer from codling moth-infested cold-stored Red Delicious thinning apples than uninfested apples. Immature Granny Smith, Red Delicious, or Golden Delicious apples that were infested on the tree for five days by codling moth larvae were more attractive to neonate codling moth larvae than similar but uninfested fruit of the same varieties. Apples infested on the tree and sampled five days later also contained significantly greater amounts of the larval attractant (E,E)-α-farnesene, compared to uninfested apples. Other types of injury to apple fruit did not produce results similar to that from codling moth infestation, either in increased attractiveness to codling moth larvae or in increased quantities of (E,E)-α-farnesene. These results are consistent with the reported attractiveness of (E,E)-α-farnesene to neonate codling moth larvae.

KW - α-farnesene

KW - Apple

KW - Attraction

KW - Behavior

KW - Codling moth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033930579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033930579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1005595014589

DO - 10.1023/A:1005595014589

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0033930579

VL - 26

SP - 1685

EP - 1699

JO - Journal of Chemical Ecology

JF - Journal of Chemical Ecology

SN - 0098-0331

IS - 7

ER -