An experimental test of the Community Assembly by Trait Selection (CATS) model

Robert T. Strahan, Daniel C. Laughlin, Margaret M Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Community Assembly by Trait Selection (CATS) model of community assembly predicts species abundances along environmental gradients in relatively undisturbed vegetation. Here we ask whether this model, when calibrated with data from natural plant communities, can predict the abundances of five dominant grass species (Bouteloua gracilis, Elymus elymoides, Festuca arizonica, Muhlenbergia Montana, and Poa fendleriana) in a greenhouse experiment that manipulated light and soil properties. To address this question, we used generalized additive models (GAMs) to model community-weighted mean (CWM) seed mass, mean Julian flowering date, and specific root length (SRL) as non-linear functions of two environmental variables (soil pH and pine basal area) in natural vegetation. The model-fitted CWM traits were then used as constraints in the CATS model to predict the relative abundance of the five grass species that were seeded in a mixture at equal densities into a 2×2 factorial experiment with soil parent material and light level as crossed factors. Light was the most important factor influencing seedling community composition, especially the abundances of Bouteloua gracilis and Poa fendleriana. The model-predicted relative abundances were significantly correlated with the observed relative abundances, and the model accurately predicted the dominant species in every treatment. P. fendleriana was correctly predicted to be the most abundant species in both shade treatments and the sun-basalt treatment, and B. gracilis was correctly predicted to be the most abundant species in the sun-limestone treatment. Our results provide experimental evidence that environmental filtering of the species pool occurs in the early stages of community assembly (including germination, emergence, and early growth), and that trait-based models calibrated with data from natural plant communities can be used to predict the outcome of the early stages of community assembly under experimental conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0206787
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Poa
Soil
Solar System
Poaceae
Poa fendleriana
Light
Elymus
Festuca
Bouteloua gracilis
Calcium Carbonate
testing
Germination
Seedlings
Seeds
Soils
Sun
Muhlenbergia montana
Festuca arizonica
plant communities
Elymus elymoides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

An experimental test of the Community Assembly by Trait Selection (CATS) model. / Strahan, Robert T.; Laughlin, Daniel C.; Moore, Margaret M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 13, No. 11, e0206787, 01.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strahan, Robert T. ; Laughlin, Daniel C. ; Moore, Margaret M. / An experimental test of the Community Assembly by Trait Selection (CATS) model. In: PLoS One. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 11.
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