Adherence to exercise prescriptions: Effects of prescribing moderate versus higher levels of intensity and frequency

Michael G. Perri, Stephen D. Anton, Patricia E. Durning, Timothy U. Ketterson, Sumner J Sydeman, Nicole E. Berlant, William F. Kanasky, Robert L. Newton, Marian C. Limacher, A. Daniel Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sedentary adults (N = 379) were randomly assigned in a 2 x 2 design to walk 30 min per day at a frequency of either 3-4 or 5-7 days per week, at an intensity of either 45%-55% or 65%-75% of maximum heart rate reserve. Analyses of exercise accumulated over 6 months showed greater amounts completed in the higher frequency (p = .0001) and moderate intensity (p = .021) conditions. Analyses of percentage of prescribed exercise completed showed greater adherence in the moderate intensity (p = .02) condition. Prescribing a higher frequency increased the accumulation of exercise without a decline in adherence, whereas prescribing a higher intensity decreased adherence and resulted in the completion of less exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-458
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Prescriptions
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Exercise
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Perri, M. G., Anton, S. D., Durning, P. E., Ketterson, T. U., Sydeman, S. J., Berlant, N. E., ... Daniel Martin, A. (2002). Adherence to exercise prescriptions: Effects of prescribing moderate versus higher levels of intensity and frequency. Health Psychology, 21(5), 452-458. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.21.5.452

Adherence to exercise prescriptions : Effects of prescribing moderate versus higher levels of intensity and frequency. / Perri, Michael G.; Anton, Stephen D.; Durning, Patricia E.; Ketterson, Timothy U.; Sydeman, Sumner J; Berlant, Nicole E.; Kanasky, William F.; Newton, Robert L.; Limacher, Marian C.; Daniel Martin, A.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.01.2002, p. 452-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perri, MG, Anton, SD, Durning, PE, Ketterson, TU, Sydeman, SJ, Berlant, NE, Kanasky, WF, Newton, RL, Limacher, MC & Daniel Martin, A 2002, 'Adherence to exercise prescriptions: Effects of prescribing moderate versus higher levels of intensity and frequency', Health Psychology, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 452-458. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.21.5.452
Perri, Michael G. ; Anton, Stephen D. ; Durning, Patricia E. ; Ketterson, Timothy U. ; Sydeman, Sumner J ; Berlant, Nicole E. ; Kanasky, William F. ; Newton, Robert L. ; Limacher, Marian C. ; Daniel Martin, A. / Adherence to exercise prescriptions : Effects of prescribing moderate versus higher levels of intensity and frequency. In: Health Psychology. 2002 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 452-458.
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