Adherence to exercise prescriptions: Effects of prescribing moderate versus higher levels of intensity and frequency

Michael G. Perri, Stephen D. Anton, Patricia E. Durning, Timothy U. Ketterson, Sumner J Sydeman, Nicole E. Berlant, William F. Kanasky, Robert L. Newton, Marian C. Limacher, A. Daniel Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sedentary adults (N = 379) were randomly assigned in a 2 x 2 design to walk 30 min per day at a frequency of either 3-4 or 5-7 days per week, at an intensity of either 45%-55% or 65%-75% of maximum heart rate reserve. Analyses of exercise accumulated over 6 months showed greater amounts completed in the higher frequency (p = .0001) and moderate intensity (p = .021) conditions. Analyses of percentage of prescribed exercise completed showed greater adherence in the moderate intensity (p = .02) condition. Prescribing a higher frequency increased the accumulation of exercise without a decline in adherence, whereas prescribing a higher intensity decreased adherence and resulted in the completion of less exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-458
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Exercise
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

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