Abrupt early Holocene (9.9-9.6 ka) ice-stream advance at the mouth of Hudson Strait, Arctic Canada

Darrell S Kaufman, G. H. Miller, J. A. Stravers, J. T. Andrews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiocarbon-dated glacial-geologic evidence documents an abrupt advance of the northern margin of the Labrador sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the last deglaciation. Ice-flow directional indicators, together with ice-marginal features found onshore and offshore, delimit an ice stream that advanced north-northeast >300 km, crossed the mouth of Hudson Strait and outer Frobisher Bay, and overran summits ~400 m above sea level on outer Hall Peninsula, southeast Baffin Island. The entire advance-retreat cycle took place in an ~300 yr (4C) interval, 9.9-9.6 ka. At its maximum extent, the ice stream supported a calving margin >200 km long terminating in open water ~500 m deep, implying a massive iceberg release. Marine evidence for the outflow is preserved along the Labrador Sea Shelf as thick carbonate-rich glacial-marine drift but has not been recognized farther east in the North Atlantic. Either the discharge of icebergs was insufficient to produce a trans-North Atlantic, carbonate-rich (Heinrich) layer, or the icebergs tracked southward where they encountered warming sea-surface temperatures. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1066
Number of pages4
JournalGeology
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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ice stream
iceberg
strait
Holocene
carbonate
last deglaciation
Laurentide Ice Sheet
ice flow
shelf sea
open water
outflow
sea surface temperature
warming
sea level
ice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

Cite this

Abrupt early Holocene (9.9-9.6 ka) ice-stream advance at the mouth of Hudson Strait, Arctic Canada. / Kaufman, Darrell S; Miller, G. H.; Stravers, J. A.; Andrews, J. T.

In: Geology, Vol. 21, No. 12, 1993, p. 1063-1066.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaufman, Darrell S ; Miller, G. H. ; Stravers, J. A. ; Andrews, J. T. / Abrupt early Holocene (9.9-9.6 ka) ice-stream advance at the mouth of Hudson Strait, Arctic Canada. In: Geology. 1993 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 1063-1066.
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