A comparison of Canadian Native Youth Justice Committees and Navajo Peacemakers

A summary of research results

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aboriginal Youth Justice Committees and Peacemakers are unique court-related initiatives designed and operated by indigenous peoples in Canada and the United States. To develop a theory about the impact of colonialism on Native justice organizations, these two initiatives were examined in terms of their organizational structures, operational technologies, developmental issues, and ideologies. These two organizations were similar in their modified indigenous culture-based structures and in the developmental issues of resistance they faced. This suggests that a colonial-based social Darwinistic ideology had impact on their development. The organizations chose to respond using a discourse of organizational effectiveness rather than of discrimination, thereby not endangering their resource-dependent relationship with the state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-25
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Contemporary Criminal Justice
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

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research results
justice
colonial age
organizational structure
Ideologies
discrimination
ideology
Canada
discourse
resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

Cite this

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abstract = "Aboriginal Youth Justice Committees and Peacemakers are unique court-related initiatives designed and operated by indigenous peoples in Canada and the United States. To develop a theory about the impact of colonialism on Native justice organizations, these two initiatives were examined in terms of their organizational structures, operational technologies, developmental issues, and ideologies. These two organizations were similar in their modified indigenous culture-based structures and in the developmental issues of resistance they faced. This suggests that a colonial-based social Darwinistic ideology had impact on their development. The organizations chose to respond using a discourse of organizational effectiveness rather than of discrimination, thereby not endangering their resource-dependent relationship with the state.",
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